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Category: Show Notes

Want an amazing array of information about Poltergeist? Then go to PoltergeistIII.com! Sounds funny, but it’s true. This is one of the best websites about the Poltergeist films, dealing not only with the original but its two sequels and the recent remake, too. You’ll find everything from marketing materials and press kits, shooting scripts, and even a floor plan of the Freeling house.
http://poltergeist.poltergeistiii.com

There’s a great deal of information available about the supposed ‘curse’ that was to befall the participants in the film, including this article from International Business Times.
http://www.ibtimes.com/poltergeist-curse-real-heres-true-story-behind-classic-1982-horror-movie-1932929

 

AMC’s Filmsite.org has done a great write-up on the film.
http://www.filmsite.org/polt.html

Check out some movie stills and their real-life locations from the movie, including the famous Tree in the Middle of the Road!
http://www.thennowmovielocations.com/2012/06/poltergeist.html

Finally, in the podcast we discussed the original versus its remake. Here’s some more opinions on that matter:

If you want to follow us on Letterboxd as well, we’re always logging and rating films we’ve been watching and occasionally Luke will do some pretty in-depth reviews, too.
Luke Kane: http://www.letterboxd.com/overbreakfast/
Damien Heath: http://www.letterboxd.com/jedikaos/

Thanks again for checking out Celluloid Junkies. We’ll see you next month with a look at Ken Russell’s much-maligned masturbatory masterpiece “The Devils”.

Our first special guest this month is Luke Buckmaster, author of “Miller and Max” first published in 2017. Luke is the film critic for Guardian Australia, and has also written for The Age, the Sydney Morning Herald, and Filmink magazine, as well as appearing on both the ABC and the BBC.

For Namibia and other under-developed countries, burning more fossil fuels offers one path to social cohesion and environmental preservation—the very opposite of collapse. The average Namibian creates just 1.4 metric tons of carbon a year, while the average Australian creates 16.7. In 2010, only 34 percent of Namibians had access to electricity, which means they cut wood or other biomass to cook dinner. Increasing electrification in Africa preserves remaining forests, cuts the time people spend scavenging wood, improves health, and, because of electric lights, creates more opportunities for education.

The environmental impact of the filming of Mad Max: Fury Road wasn’t lost on the country of Namibia. Ecological damage was caused and then left, but Slate did an excellent job of looking at how increasing use of fossil fuels (something the Mad Max series has forewarned against) could in fact help the country.
http://www.slate.com/articles/technology/future_tense/2013/02/mad_max_fury_road_filming_and_environmental_damage_in_namibia.html

Mad Max: Fury Road is now renowned for its amazing on-set stunts. A lot of what you see on screen looks exactly as it was shot, with little to no CGI used in many of the stunt or explosion sequences. Here’s a YouTube video showing what was shot, and how it looked in the final edit:

If you want to follow us on Letterboxd as well, we’re always logging and rating films we’ve been watching and occasionally Luke will do some pretty in-depth reviews, too.
Luke Kane: http://www.letterboxd.com/overbreakfast/
Cameron Crothers: http://www.letterboxd.com/crot00192/
Damien Heath: http://www.letterboxd.com/jedikaos/

Thanks again for checking out Celluloid Junkies. We’ll see you next month with a special Halloween episode on Tobe Hooper’s “Poltergeist”. Or is it Steven Spielberg’s? Hmmm…

Our special guest this month is Alexandra Heller-Nicholas, a prolific Australian film critic and writer of many articles and books on horror film theory. She is the author of “Devil’s Advocates: Suspiria” first published in 2015.

Alexandra is also the editor of and a writer for Senses of Cinema, one of the best film websites around. Check out her work, which includes a lot of writing on horror cinema and Australian cinema.
http://sensesofcinema.com/author/alexandra-heller-nicholas/

Alexandra wrote a piece of Suspiria, Argento and cinematographer Luciano Tovoli for Senses of Cinema.
http://sensesofcinema.com/2015/feature-articles/luciano-tovoli-suspiria/

You can also check out Alexandra’s personal website for a more comprehensive overview of her work, including other books that she has written.
http://www.thebluelenses.com

Suspiria is currently doing the rounds in cinemas, being projected in both 4K as well as from a new 35mm film print that has been discovered. Check it out while you can!
http://www.indiewire.com/2017/06/suspiria-uncut-35mm-print-discovered-screenings-1201844977/

Dario Argento is a student of cinema as much as he is a master. The British Film Institute took a look at five films that inspired Argento along the way to create his masterpiece.
http://www.bfi.org.uk/news-opinion/news-bfi/features/suspiria-dario-argento-influences

Den of Geek took a look back at Suspiria recently, calling it a one-off in their article “Looking back at Dario Argento’s Suspiria”.
http://www.denofgeek.com/movies/suspiria/21300/looking-back-at-dario-argento’s-suspiria

Film School Rejects also took a look back, focusing on the composition of shots used in the film to create an element of displacement and suspense.
https://filmschoolrejects.com/perfect-shots-dario-argentos-suspiria/

Slash Film have called Suspiria the craziest, most colourful bad dream you’ll ever watch.
http://www.slashfilm.com/suspiria-review/

If you want to follow us on Letterboxd as well, we’re always logging and rating films we’ve been watching and occasionally Luke will do some pretty in-depth reviews, too.
Luke Kane: http://www.letterboxd.com/overbreakfast/
Cameron Crothers: http://www.letterboxd.com/crot00192/
Damien Heath: http://www.letterboxd.com/jedikaos/

Thanks again for checking out Celluloid Junkies. We’ll see you next month with a close-up, in depth look at George Miller’s “Mad Max: Fury Road”, the second film we’ve looked at from an Australian director.

Our first special guest this month is Lesley Brill, author of “John Huston’s Filmmaking” first published in 1997. Lesley is a Professor of English and Film Studies at Wayne State University.

Our second special guest this month is Jason Taylor, who created and writes The Bogie Film Blog. It’s an invaluable source of information on Humphrey Bogart, so check it out.
https://bogiefilmblog.wordpress.com

Variety magazine from January 1949 listed the top box-office grossers of 1948. This is interesting just for historical purposes; the number one movie grossed $4.5 million that year, equivalent to about $45 million today. Key Largo came in 18th with $3.25 million.
https://archive.org/stream/variety173-1949-01#page/n45/mode/1up

Hollywood’s Golden Age looks at, well, Hollywood’s “golden age” from 1930-1959, and has lots of great trivia about Key Largo and many other films from the period.
http://www.hollywoodsgoldenage.com/movies/key_largo.html

One of our favourite podcasts is Karina Longworth’s You Must Remember This. We’ve referenced it numerous times, including in this episode and in our Baby Jane episode. Check out their episode on The Blacklist, HUAC, and Humphrey Bogart’s very bad trip to Washington in 1947.
http://www.slate.com/articles/podcasts/you_must_remember_this/2016/03/you_must_remember_this_on_the_blacklist_humphrey_bogart_and_the_african.html

Den of Geek call Key Largo the “definitive post-war film”, and we couldn’t really disagree as far as American films go. Just as Bicycle Thieves in Italy captured the post-war depression of that European country, so does Key Largo capture the triumph of patriotism and the defeat of Communism.
http://www.denofgeek.com/us/movies/key-largo/238347/key-largo-lauren-bacall-the-definitive-post-war-film

Movie Diva looks at Key Largo in the context of not only the film, but Hollywood at the time and the careers of all of the film’s major players, including Huston, Bogart and Bacall. Worth a read.
http://www.moviediva.com/MD_root/reviewpages/MDKeyLargo.htm

“4’33 The Movie” is a 2012 edit of Key Largo set to ‘music’ by John Cage. This experiment by Cage looks at creating music with the atmosphere, wherever and whatever that may be. Key Largo is a sophisticated mix of sound and action, and when the dialogue is removed, as it is here, it takes on a sinister quality:

 

If you want to follow us on Letterboxd as well, we’re always logging and rating films we’ve been watching and occasionally Luke will do some pretty in-depth reviews, too.
Luke Kane: http://www.letterboxd.com/overbreakfast/
Cameron Crothers: http://www.letterboxd.com/crot00192/
Damien Heath: http://www.letterboxd.com/jedikaos/

Thanks for listening to the first season of Celluloid Junkies. We’ll see you next season with a debut episode discussing Dario Argento’s Italian giallo horror masterpiece “Suspiria”.

AMC’s Filmsite.org has again given us a stellar write-up of this classic movie. Check this out, and then spend the next few months of your life following links on their page and researching every other great American movie ever made.
http://www.filmsite.org/what.html

VICE Magazine wrote a great article on why Baby Jane should not be considered ‘camp’, but instead should be regarded as one of the greatest movies of all-time.
https://www.vice.com/en_us/article/forget-campwhat-ever-happened-to-baby-jane-is-one-of-the-best-films-of-all-time

Dramatica has done another story write-up, following the key story arcs and dramatic beats of Lukas Heller’s gothic horror screenplay.
http://dramatica.com/articles/what-ever-happened-to-baby-jane

If you don’t listen to the podcast “You Must Remember This”, then you must be missing out. Recently host Karina Longworth did a series called Six Degrees of Joan Crawford, and dedicated an episode to Baby Jane and the feud between Crawford and Bette Davis.
http://www.youmustrememberthispodcast.com/episodes/2016/9/3/six-degrees-of-joan-crawford-bette-davis-and-what-ever-happened-to-baby-jane

The University of Kent hold an interestingly-titled Melodrama Research Group, and have done an equally interesting article on Baby Jane.
https://blogs.kent.ac.uk/melodramaresearchgroup/2013/11/01/summary-of-discussion-on-what-ever-happened-to-baby-jane/

Senses of Cinema is another great website, and here’s their in-depth look at the movie.
http://sensesofcinema.com/2006/cteq/what-ever-baby-jane/

If you haven’t seen Bette Davis singing “What Ever Happened to Baby Jane” on the Andy Williams Show, your life just isn’t complete.

 

The New York Times says Feud asks a question that is as important now as it was in 1962: where are the roles for women in the entertainment industry?
https://www.nytimes.com/2017/03/02/arts/television/feud-fx-ryan-murphy-jessica-lange-susan-sarandon.html?_r=1

Harpers Bazaar has a thrilling timeline of the real-life antagonism between the two great actresses.
http://www.harpersbazaar.com/culture/film-tv/a20666/feud-bette-davis-joan-crawford-timeline/

Flavorwire compare the show to the movie, and state that much of the ‘feud’ is on-screen in Baby Jane.
http://flavorwire.com/600794/what-what-ever-happened-to-baby-jane-already-told-us-about-bette-and-joans-feud

Australian newspaper the Sydney Morning Herald looks at how the Hollywood system was originally responsible for turning Davis and Crawford against one another.
http://www.smh.com.au/entertainment/tv-and-radio/feud-how-sexist-hollywood-turned-bette-and-joan-against-each-other-on-baby-jane-20170321-gv2son.html

Finally, Vanity Fair discuss the amazing opening credits of FX’s Feud. If you haven’t seen it, you need to!
http://www.vanityfair.com/hollywood/2017/03/ryan-murphy-feud-opening-credits-interview

Alfred Hitchcock’s “Rear Window” is an epic film, well and truly deserving of its place in the discussion of the best films of all-time. So we’ve done an epic podcast to cover it, and we’ve got an epic set of Show Notes to link you to some interesting discussion of the film. If you love the movie, we hope you’ll enjoy reading more about it.

Our first special guest this month is Murray Pomerance, author of “Alfred Hitchcock’s America” first published in 2013, and “An Eye For Hitchcock” first published in 2004. Murray is a Professor in the Department of Sociology at Ryerson University in Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Our second special guest this month is John Fawell, author of “Alfred Hitchcock’s Rear Window: The Well-Made Film” first published in 2001. John is a Professor of Humanities at the College of General Studies at Boston University.

John Fawell also provided the audio commentary for Universal Studio’s remastered release of the 2008 DVD of “Rear Window”. This audio commentary was carried over to the 2012 Blu-ray release, which is available separately or as part of the 14-movie Alfred Hitchcock Masterpiece Collection.

Filmmaker Jeff Desom created a time lapse of the amazing set used in “Rear Window” which is definitely worth checking out.
http://www.criticalcommons.org/Members/ccManager/clips/spatialized-timelapse-of-hitchcocks-rear-window/view

Or you could just check out 1,000 frames from the movie, courtesy of The Alfred Hitchcock Wiki.
https://the.hitchcock.zone/wiki/1000_Frames_of_Rear_Window_(1954)

AMC’s excellent Filmsite.org has one of the best write-ups on the movie available anywhere online. It’s a very in-depth analysis of the plot, as well as a brief history of the movie.
http://www.filmsite.org/rear.html

Likewise, Turner Classic Movies has a pretty thorough set of links dealing with the movie, including a synopsis, review, trivia, quotes and behind-the-scenes.
http://www.tcm.com/tcmdb/title/87777/Rear-Window/articles.html

Dramatica have done a comprehensive analysis of “Rear Window”, including a storyform analysis, character analysis and ploy analysis. If you’re interested in how Hitchcock’s film works in any of these ways, this makes for some very interesting reading.
http://dramatica.com/analysis/rear-window

No Film School have done a good analysis of the editing techniques used in the film. ‘How Hitchcock used editing to turn “Rear Window” into a masterpiece of visual storytelling’.
http://nofilmschool.com/2014/07/alfred-hitchcock-editing-rear-window-kuleshov-effect

Dangerous Minds have compiled a series of amazing behind-the-scenes photos, all of which are worthwhile for film historians, Hitchcock fans and lovers of the movie.
http://dangerousminds.net/comments/behind_scenes_alfred_hitchcock_rear_window

If you want to follow us on Letterboxd as well, we’re always logging and rating films we’ve been watching and occasionally Luke will do some pretty in-depth reviews, too.
Luke Kane: http://www.letterboxd.com/overbreakfast/
Cameron Crothers: http://www.letterboxd.com/crot00192/
Damien Heath: http://www.letterboxd.com/jedikaos/

Thanks again for checking out Celluloid Junkies. We’ll see you next month with a close-up, in depth look at John Huston’s “Key Largo”.

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