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Category: Podcast Episode

SPECIAL GUEST
Author Mark Nichols, “Scorsese’s Men: Melancholia and the Mob”

This month we are taking care of business as we look back at Martin Scorsese’s 1990 masterpiece GoodFellas.

This podcast is non-profit and has been broadcast for educational purposes. Excerpts from the following material has been included to enhance the listener experience:

MOVIES
GoodFellas (1990) dir. Martin Scorsese, USA
Adaptation (2002) dir. Spike Jonze, USA
Casino (1995) dir. Martin Scorsese, USA

SONGS
“Rags to Riches” Tony Bennett
“Beyond the Sea” Bobby Darin
“Layla” Derek and the Dominos
“Then He Kissed Me” The Crystals
“Boulevard of Broken Dreams” Green Day
“Sunshine of your Love” Cream

SHOW NOTES

Here’s a range of Wikipedia articles on the lives of those involved who inspired Nicholas Pileggi’s book “Wiseguy” and the film.

Here’s a video supercut of all the fast dolly zooms used by Martin Scorsese through the years. From “Mean Streets” through “The Wolf of Wall Street”.
http://theplaylist.net/hang-supercut-highlighting-martin-scorseses-fast-dolly-zoom-shots-20161102/?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=twitter

Here’s Reel Club’s guide to the memorable sequences from the film.
https://reelclub.wordpress.com/2013/05/12/take-the-shot-sequence-shots-in-scorseses-goodfellas/

The Film Spectrum also has a great history of the movie, full of clips which would otherwise be lost to time, including Joe Pesci’s acceptance of the Best Supporting Actor Academy Award in 1991.
http://thefilmspectrum.com/?p=19745

If you want to follow us on Letterboxd, we’re always logging and rating films we’ve been watching and occasionally Luke will do some pretty in-depth reviews, too.

Luke Kane: http://www.letterboxd.com/overbreakfast/
Damien Heath: http://www.letterboxd.com/jedikaos/
Cameron Crothers: http://www.letterboxd.com/crot00192/

You can find Celluloid Junkies on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube and Pinterest. Luke is also on Twitter, as is Damien.

In honour of Halloween, Celluloid Junkies is taking a look back at An American Werewolf In London (1981), the iconic horror-comedy classic from John Landis.

This podcast is non-profit and has been broadcast for educational purposes. Excerpts from the following material has been included to enhance the listener experience:

MOVIES
An American Werewolf In London (1981) dir. John Landis, USA
The Evil Dead (1981) dir. Sam Raimi, USA

SHOW NOTES

Salon did a retrospective look at the impact of the film very recently. ‘”Stay off the moors!”: John Landis’ An American Werewolf In London is a modern horror masterpiece’.
http://www.salon.com/2016/10/15/stay-off-the-moors-john-landis-an-american-werewolf-in-london-is-a-modern-horror-masterpiece/

Joshua Rothkopf did the same for Rolling Stone magazine a few months ago. ‘How American Werewolf In London transformed horror-comedy’.
http://www.rollingstone.com/movies/news/how-american-werewolf-in-london-transformed-horror-comedy-w434829

If you want to find out a little bit more about werewolf mythology, jump on the Historic Mysteries website and their page ‘The history of the werewolf legend’.
http://www.historicmysteries.com/history-of-the-werewolf-legend/

WARNING: GRAPHIC FOOTAGE
Following American Werewolf, Landis was involved with the theatrical version of ‘The Twilight Zone’, and it was an ill-fated production from the start. Ultimately, a mishap on set featuring an explosion and a helicopter led to the death of three actors during Landis’ section of the movie. There’s a Youtube video featuring a short history of the decisions which led to the catastrophe, and the actual video of the accident.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OrtKaykLjfQ

Here’s the Letterboxd list created by Luke entitled ‘The Whole Town Is In On It’, regarding the cinematic trope of an entire townsfolk hiding a dark secret.
http://letterboxd.com/overbreakfast/list/the-whole-town-is-in-on-it/

If you want to follow us on Letterboxd, we’re always logging and rating films we’ve been watching and occasionally Luke will do some pretty in-depth reviews, too.

Luke Kane: http://www.letterboxd.com/overbreakfast/
Damien Heath: http://www.letterboxd.com/jedikaos/
Cameron Crothers: http://www.letterboxd.com/crot00192/

You can find Celluloid Junkies on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube and Pinterest. Luke is also on Twitter, as is Damien.

This month we are taking note of the exits as we look back at Peter Weir’s 1993 bleak psychological drama ‘Fearless’.

This podcast is non-profit and has been broadcast for educational purposes. Excerpts from the following material has been included to enhance the listener experience:

MOVIES
Fearless (1993) dir. Peter Weir, USA

SHOW NOTES

Peter Weir is one of Hollywood’s most celebrated directors, and arguably the most successful Australian directing export of the Australian New Wave cinema movement. After making Australian classics “Picnic at Hanging Rock”, “The Last Wave” and “Gallipoli”, among others, he moved to working in America, directing “Witness”, “Dead Poet’s Society” and “The Truman Show”, as well as the topic for this month’s podcast – his 1993 drama “Fearless”.

The great fan-site Peter Weir Cave has a series of articles on the director and this film.

Anne Morra did a 2013 retrospective of the film for the Museum of Modern Art’s screenings, ‘Rediscovering Peter Weir’s Fearless’.
http://www.moma.org/explore/inside_out/2013/07/25/rediscovering-peter-weirs-fearless

Here’s Hal Hinson’s great review for the Washington Post.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/style/longterm/movies/videos/fearlessrhinson_a0a88b.htm

Jeff Bridges took panoramic photos on-set for most of the films he’s been involved with over the last three decades. Here’s a collection of some of them, including from Fearless.
http://airows.com/culture/jeff-bridges-took-incredible-panoramic-photos-on-the-set-of-every-movie-for-the-last-30-years

Oh, and here’s Gary Busey’s Twitter…
https://twitter.com/THEGaryBusey

If you want to follow us on Letterboxd, we’re always logging and rating films we’ve been watching and occasionally Luke will do some pretty in-depth reviews, too.

Luke Kane: http://www.letterboxd.com/overbreakfast/
Damien Heath: http://www.letterboxd.com/jedikaos/
Cameron Crothers: http://www.letterboxd.com/crot00192/

Luke also wrote an in-depth review of the film in August 2016 on his Letterboxd account.
http://letterboxd.com/overbreakfast/film/fearless/

You can find Celluloid Junkies on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube and Pinterest. Luke is also on Twitter, as is Damien.

This week we board a vaporetto and navigate the murky waters of Nicolas Roeg’s 1973 supernatural classic Don’t Look Now.

This podcast is non-profit and has been broadcast for educational purposes. Excerpts from the following material has been included to enhance the listener experience:

MOVIES
Don’t Look Now (1973) dir. Nicolas Roeg, ENG
Don’t Look Now: Looking back (2002) dir. David Gregory, ENG
The Shining (1980) dir. Stanley Kubrick, USA
The Wicker Man (1973) dir. Robin Hardy, ENG

SHOW NOTES

The British are obviously very reverent about this movie, and as such there’s a huge amount of great retrospective content available on the web. Here’s some of the best:

Likewise, here’s some of the more in-depth reviews and analysis of the film, from all over the web and all over the world:

Venetian locations play such a huge part in Don’t Look Now that multiple studies have been done of the exact locations for the shoot, and their history. Here’s two of them:

The British Board of Film Classification began engaging very openly with the public following a revision of their guidelines for film classification in 2000. They produced a series of Case Studies on some of the most important films they’ve dealt with in their history, going over the reasons for their classifications, and here’s their case study on Don’t Look Now.
http://www.bbfc.co.uk/case-studies/dont-look-now

Here’s a PDF version of Pauline Kael’s excellent review of Don’t Look Now.
https://www.celluloidjunkies.com/podfiles/dln-kael.pdf [PDF, 2.8MB]

If you want to follow us on Letterboxd, we’re always logging and rating films we’ve been watching and occasionally Luke will do some pretty in-depth reviews, too.

Luke Kane: http://www.letterboxd.com/overbreakfast/
Damien Heath: http://www.letterboxd.com/jedikaos/
Cameron Crothers: http://www.letterboxd.com/crot00192/

Luke also wrote an in-depth review of the film in July 2015 on his Letterbox account.
http://letterboxd.com/overbreakfast/film/dont-look-now/

You can find Celluloid Junkies on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube and Pinterest. Luke is also on Twitter, as is Damien.

In this week’s podcast we will be asking the serious questions – like does a thing know that it’s a thing?

In our first podcast we explore John Carpenter’s 1982 nihilistic science-fiction thriller The Thing, taking you on a virtual tour through its narrative and providing retrospective asides about its production, release, thematic content, social impact and critical reappraisal over the years.

This podcast is non-profit and has been broadcast for educational purposes. Excerpts from the following material has been included to enhance the listener experience:

MOVIES
Jaws: The Revenge (1987) dir. Joseph Sargent, USA
Poltergeist (1982) dir. Tobe Hooper, USA
The Birds (1963) dir. Alfred Hitchcock, USA
The China Syndrome (1979) dir. James Bridges, USA
The Thing (1982) dir. John Carpenter, USA
The Thing: Terror Takes Shape (1998) dir. Michael Matessino, USA
They Live (1989) dir. John Carpenter, USA

SHOW NOTES

There’s an excellent fansite for this movie with a lot of invaluable research called Outpost 31. You can find some very thorough discussion of the movie, a timeline of the major events, and a frequently asked questions which goes over a lot of the mythology of the events in the film.
http://www.outpost31.com/

Producer Stuart Cohen wrote a series of blog posts at the start of this decade, which gives a timeline of the events surrounding the first half of shooting and Carpenter’s extensive rewrites to the script, among many other things including casting and budget.
http://theoriginalfan.blogspot.com.au

Jonathan Rosenbaum’s blog details his set visit in December 1981.
http://www.jonathanrosenbaum.net

Joe Valdez has written a great piece called “Is this the most-hated film of all-time?” at This Distracted Globe. It runs through the production, release and reception of the movie very well.
http://thisdistractedglobe.com/2009/05/14/the-thing/

Anne Bilson wrote an excellent retrospective on the film in 2009, prior to the release of the prequel, for The Guardian.
https://www.theguardian.com/film/2009/aug/27/the-thing-john-carpenter

There’s a lot of places on the web that hotly debate the ending of the movie. Some of the betters ones are listed here.

For a different perspective, writer Peter Watts wrote a short story “The Things” for Clarkesworld Magazine. It was nominated for or a finalist for the 2011 Hugo Awards, 2010 BSFA Awards, 2011 Locus Award for Best Short Story, and 2011 Theodore Sturgeon Award. It won the 2010 Shirley Jackson Award. It’s a story written from the viewpoint of the Thing itself and is available in its entirety on the Clarkesworld website.
http://clarkesworldmagazine.com/watts_01_10/

If you want to follow us on Letterboxd, we’re always logging and rating films we’ve been watching and occasionally Luke will do some pretty in-depth reviews, too.

Luke Kane: http://www.letterboxd.com/overbreakfast/
Damien Heath: http://www.letterboxd.com/jedikaos/
Cameron Crothers: http://www.letterboxd.com/crot00192/

Luke also wrote an in-depth review of the film in June 2014 on his Letterbox account.
http://letterboxd.com/overbreakfast/film/the-thing/

You can find Celluloid Junkies on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube and Pinterest. Luke is also on Twitter, as is Damien.

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