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Category: Podcast Episode

We’re doing something we haven’t done before as we take a look back at 2017. We’ll review each of the Best Picture nominees for next month’s Academy Awards, each list our five favourite films of 2017, and each give away 10 awards in the inaugural Celluloid Junkies Oscars Preview!

This podcast is non-profit and has been broadcast for educational purposes. Excerpts from the following material has been included to enhance the listener experience:

FILM
Silent Night, Deadly Night (1984) dir. Charles Sellier Jr., USA
The Silence of the Lambs (1991) dir. Jonathan Demme, USA

SONGS
“American Girl” (1977) w: Tom Petty, p: Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers

SHOW NOTES

If you want to follow us on Letterboxd, we’re always logging and rating films we’ve been watching and occasionally Luke will do some pretty in-depth reviews, too.

Luke Kane: http://www.letterboxd.com/overbreakfast/
Damien Heath: http://www.letterboxd.com/jedikaos/

You can find Celluloid Junkies on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube and Pinterest. Luke is also on Twitter, as is Damien.

In the first episode of 2018, returning guest host Cassandra Kane joins us as we look at Frank Pierson’s 1976 romantic musical drama “A Star Is Born”.

This podcast is non-profit and has been broadcast for educational purposes. Excerpts from the following material has been included to enhance the listener experience:

FILM
A Star is Born (1976) dir. Frank Pierson, USA

SONGS
“The Man That Got Away” (1954) w: Harold Arlen & Ira Gershwin, p: Judy Garland
“Everything” (1976) w: Rupert Holmes & Paul Williams, p: Barbra Streisand
“Lost Inside of You” (1976) w: Barbra Streisand & Leon Russell, p: Barbra Streisand
“Evergreen” (1976) w: Barbra Streisand & Paul Williams, p: Barbra Streisand
“Evergreen” (1976) w: Barbra Streisand & Paul Williams, p: Henry Mancini Band
“The Woman in the Moon” (1976) w: Paul Williams & Kenny Ascher, p: Barbra Streisand
“I Believe in Love” (1976) w: Kenny Loggins and Alan & Marilyn Bergman, p: Barbra Streisand
“Finale: With One More Look at You/Watch Closely Now” (1976) w: Paul Williams & Kenny Ascher, p: Barbra Streisand

INTERVIEW
Streisand 1976 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZanBEbho7ro

SHOW NOTES

Read the New West article “My Battles With Barbra and Jon” by director Frank Pierson. A riveting read full of interesting facts with very healthy amounts of rumours and innuendo. Who you believe may come down to where you sit on the Streisand Scale.
http://barbra-archives.com/bjs_library/70s/new_west_battles_barbra_jon.html

Check out Pauline Kael’s full, five-page review of the film. You may disagree, you may agree, but either way you’ll appreciate the way she puts her thoughts into words.
https://celluloidjunkies.com/podfiles/asib-kael.pdf

We’ve spoken a lot recently about gender inequality in Hollywood, and in this episode we specifically discuss changes in the acceptance of gender roles due to Barbra Streisand’s producing, writing and directing. She won an Academy Award for Best Original Song for “Evergreen” from this movie, the first time a female had won that award as a composer. Her role in changing gender stereotypes cannot be understated, but there is still immense work to be done.

Zohar Altman David wrote specifically about Streisand in his research paper for Tel Aviv University, “The star as a Creation and the Star as a creator: The case of Barbra Streisand”.
http://iipc.utu.fi/reconsidered/Ravid.pdf

The Bechdel Test

The Bechdel Test Comic Strip

In 1985 a cartoonist named Alison Bechdel wrote and illustrated a strip from her “Dykes to Watch Out For” series which included a ‘rule’ first posited by her friend Liz Wallace. It became known as the Bechdel Test, and started being used to judge the equality of acting roles for women. There’s three features of the rule, and to pass a film must meet all of them: first, the film must have two named female characters; second, those female characters must talk to each other; third, that conversation must not be about a man.

Does A Star Is Born pass The Bechdel Test? Unfortunately, that’s a big no. There’s only one named female character, and that’s Esther.
https://bechdeltest.com/view/3722/a_star_is_born/

Check out if your favourite films pass The Bechdel Test.
https://bechdeltest.com

If you want to follow us on Letterboxd, we’re always logging and rating films we’ve been watching and occasionally Luke will do some pretty in-depth reviews, too.

Luke Kane: http://www.letterboxd.com/overbreakfast/
Damien Heath: http://www.letterboxd.com/jedikaos/

You can find Celluloid Junkies on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube and Pinterest. Luke is also on Twitter, as is Damien.

Thanks again for checking out Celluloid Junkies. We’ll see you next month with a close-up, in depth look at Lynne Ramsay’s adaptation of Lionel Shriver’s best-selling novel “We Need to Talk About Kevin”.

This month the revised Celluloid Junkies line-up is cloistered in an Ursuline convent, profiling Ken Russell’s disturbing 1971 political horror film The Devils.

This podcast is non-profit and has been broadcast for educational purposes. Excerpts from the following material has been included to enhance the listener experience:

MOVIES
Witchfinder General (1968) dir. Michael Reeves, ENG
The Devils (1971) dir. Ken Russell, ENG

SONGS
“Devil’s Suite” (1971) w & p: Peter Maxwell Davies
“There is a Light That Never Goes Out” (1992) w: Johnny Marr & Morrissey, p: The Smiths

SHOW NOTES

He could have been James Bond, but British cinema’s most notorious hellraiser lost focus and died at the age of 61, leaving Ridley Scott to piece together his final performance as the slave dealer Proximo in Gladiator (2000) using outtakes, body doubles and CGI. Such was the affection for Oliver Reed among BAFTA members, however, that he was posthumously nominated for the best supporting actor award. But the public had come to think of him as a drunk making a boorish spectacle of himself on chat shows and Channel Four forums like After Dark. “Let’s face it”, Reed told critic Roger Ebert around the time he made Women in Love (1969). “There has to be somebody like me around. The press can’t write about fruits in paisley shirts. They like somebody like Richard Harris or myself, somebody who’s a boozer and gets in fights and is colourful as hell.”

The British Film Institute wrote this, and a lot more, in their list of ten essential Oliver Reed films. The Devils features, as do two more collaborations with Ken Russell.
http://www.bfi.org.uk/news-opinion/news-bfi/lists/oliver-reed-10-essential-films

The Quietus, on the other hand, wrote a stellar defence of the actor when they celebrated the BFI’s release of The Devils on special edition DVD.
http://thequietus.com/articles/08283-oliver-reed-the-devils-ken-russell-bfi-dvd

Then there’s the modern-day reassessment of the critically panned film, and here’s some of the best:

Finally, you must watch Hell on Earth: The Desecration and Resurrection of The Devils, a documentary in which critic Mark Kermode goes on the search for the missing footage. Featuring interviews with many of the key players from the film.

If you want to follow us on Letterboxd, we’re always logging and rating films we’ve been watching and occasionally Luke will do some pretty in-depth reviews, too.

Luke Kane: http://www.letterboxd.com/overbreakfast/
Damien Heath: http://www.letterboxd.com/jedikaos/

You can find Celluloid Junkies on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube and Pinterest. Luke is also on Twitter, as is Damien.

Thanks again for checking out Celluloid Junkies. We’ll see you next month with a close-up, in depth look at the various film versions of “A Star Is Born”, focusing on Frank Pierson’s 1976 version starring Barbra Streisand and Kris Kristofferson.

SPECIAL GUEST
Dean Treadway, “Movie Geeks United” podcast co-host

Just for kicks, we present a special episode on Darren Aronofsky’s controversial and entirely brilliant new movie. It is simultaneously an unyielding exploration of faith; a harsh criticism of man’s plundering of finite natural resources; a relationship drama; and the most uncomfortable film an introvert could ever experience.

If you haven’t actually seen this film, stop now and see it. We’ll still be here when you get back, and we guarantee there will be a lot to talk about.

This podcast is non-profit and has been broadcast for educational purposes. Excerpts from the following material has been included to enhance the listener experience:

MOVIES
mother! (2017) dir. Darren Aronofsky, USA

SONGS
“mother!” [Score] (2017) w: Johann Johannsson

SHOW NOTES

Check out the work of this month’s special guest Dean Treadway, co-host of the “Movie Geeks United” podcast. Dean has been involved in film criticism, film festival programming, and television performance and programming for more than 25 years.

If you want to follow us on Letterboxd, we’re always logging and rating films we’ve been watching and occasionally Luke will do some pretty in-depth reviews, too.

Luke Kane: http://www.letterboxd.com/overbreakfast/
Damien Heath: http://www.letterboxd.com/jedikaos/

You can find Celluloid Junkies on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube and Pinterest. Luke is also on Twitter, as is Damien.

Every October we celebrate Halloween by profiling a great horror film, and this year we’re taking Tobe Hooper’s Poltergeist out for a spin.

This podcast is non-profit and has been broadcast for educational purposes. Excerpts from the following material has been included to enhance the listener experience:

MOVIES
Poltergeist (1982) dir. Tobe Hooper, USA
Poltergeist II: The Other Side (1986) dir. Brian Gibson, USA

OTHER
Interview: Tobe Hooper by Mick Garris
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k0dzAiebr-Y

SONGS
“Poltergeist” [Score] (1982) w: Jerry Goldsmith

SHOW NOTES

Want an amazing array of information about Poltergeist? Then go to PoltergeistIII.com! Sounds funny, but it’s true. This is one of the best websites about the Poltergeist films, dealing not only with the original but its two sequels and the recent remake, too. You’ll find everything from marketing materials and press kits, shooting scripts, and even a floor plan of the Freeling house.
http://poltergeist.poltergeistiii.com

There’s a great deal of information available about the supposed ‘curse’ that was to befall the participants in the film, including this article from International Business Times.
http://www.ibtimes.com/poltergeist-curse-real-heres-true-story-behind-classic-1982-horror-movie-1932929

 

The Creepy Files Episode 1: The Poltergeist Curse

AMC’s Filmsite.org has done a great write-up on the film.
http://www.filmsite.org/polt.html

Check out some movie stills and their real-life locations from the movie, including the famous Tree in the Middle of the Road!
http://www.thennowmovielocations.com/2012/06/poltergeist.html

Finally, in the podcast we discussed the original versus its remake. Here’s some more opinions on that matter:

If you want to follow us on Letterboxd, we’re always logging and rating films we’ve been watching and occasionally Luke will do some pretty in-depth reviews, too.

Luke Kane: http://www.letterboxd.com/overbreakfast/
Damien Heath: http://www.letterboxd.com/jedikaos/

You can find Celluloid Junkies on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube and Pinterest. Luke is also on Twitter, as is Damien.

Thanks again for checking out Celluloid Junkies. We’ll see you next month with a look at Ken Russell’s much-maligned masturbatory masterpiece “The Devils”.

SPECIAL GUEST
Author Luke Buckmaster, “Miller and Max”

What a day, what a lovely day this is as we take you on an auditory tour of George Miller’s vicious 2015 dystopian masterpiece Mad Max: Fury Road.

This podcast is non-profit and has been broadcast for educational purposes. Excerpts from the following material has been included to enhance the listener experience:

MOVIES
Mad Max: Fury Road (2015) dir. George Miller, Australia

SHOW NOTES

Our first special guest this month is Luke Buckmaster, author of “Miller and Max” first published in 2017. Luke is the film critic for Guardian Australia, and has also written for The Age, the Sydney Morning Herald, and Filmink magazine, as well as appearing on both the ABC and the BBC.

For Namibia and other under-developed countries, burning more fossil fuels offers one path to social cohesion and environmental preservation—the very opposite of collapse. The average Namibian creates just 1.4 metric tons of carbon a year, while the average Australian creates 16.7. In 2010, only 34 percent of Namibians had access to electricity, which means they cut wood or other biomass to cook dinner. Increasing electrification in Africa preserves remaining forests, cuts the time people spend scavenging wood, improves health, and, because of electric lights, creates more opportunities for education.

The environmental impact of the filming of Mad Max: Fury Road wasn’t lost on the country of Namibia. Ecological damage was caused and then left, but Slate did an excellent job of looking at how increasing use of fossil fuels (something the Mad Max series has forewarned against) could in fact help the country.
http://www.slate.com/articles/technology/future_tense/2013/02/mad_max_fury_road_filming_and_environmental_damage_in_namibia.html

Mad Max: Fury Road is now renowned for its amazing on-set stunts. A lot of what you see on screen looks exactly as it was shot, with little to no CGI used in many of the stunt or explosion sequences. Here’s a YouTube video showing what was shot, and how it looked in the final edit.

If you want to follow us on Letterboxd, we’re always logging and rating films we’ve been watching and occasionally Luke will do some pretty in-depth reviews, too.

Luke Kane: http://www.letterboxd.com/overbreakfast/
Damien Heath: http://www.letterboxd.com/jedikaos/
Cameron Crothers: http://www.letterboxd.com/crot00192/

You can find Celluloid Junkies on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube and Pinterest. Luke is also on Twitter, as is Damien.

Thanks again for checking out Celluloid Junkies. We’ll see you next month with a special Halloween episode on Tobe Hooper’s “Poltergeist”. Or is it Steven Spielberg’s? Hmmm…

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