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Category: Podcast Episode

Episode 32 – Tobe Hooper’s The Texas Chain Saw Massacre (1974)

Don’t pick up strangers. Don’t venture into unknown places. Don’t let yourself into empty houses. Or you could end up like these five unlucky young souls in Tobe Hooper’s The Texas Chain Saw Massacre.

This podcast is non-profit and has been broadcast for educational purposes. Excerpts from the following material has been included to enhance the listener experience:

FILM
The Texas Chain Saw Massacre (1974) dir. Tobe Hooper, USA
Eaten Alive (1976) dir. Tobe Hooper, USA
Fatal Attraction (1987) dir. Adrian Lyne, USA

If you want to follow us on Letterboxd, we’re always logging and rating films we’ve been watching and occasionally Luke will do some pretty in-depth reviews, too.

Luke Kane: http://www.letterboxd.com/kanemutiny/
Damien Heath: http://www.letterboxd.com/jedikaos/

You can find Celluloid Junkies on FacebookTwitterInstagramYouTube and Pinterest.

Luke is also on Twitter, as is Damien

Thanks again for checking out Celluloid Junkies. Join us next time as we look at Adrian Lyne’s psycho-sexual thriller Fatal Attraction. Until then, don’t forget to check out the archives, or hit up our website.

Bring your protest signs and join us in the revolution as we explore Hal Ashby’s 1971 comedy-drama Harold and Maude.

This podcast is non-profit and has been broadcast for educational purposes. Excerpts from the following material has been included to enhance the listener experience:

FILM
Harold and Maude (1971) dir. Hal Ashby, USA

TELEVISION
This is Your Life, November 21st 1971, syndicated TV series

MUSIC
“Trouble” (1970) from Mona Bone Jakon, w&p: Cat Stevens
“Tea for the Tillerman” (1970) from Tea for the Tillerman, w&p: Cat Stevens
“Where Do the Children Play?” (1970) from Tea for the Tillerman, w&p: Cat Stevens
“If You Want to Sing Out, Sing Out” (1971) from Harold and Maude, w&p: Cat Stevens

If you want to follow us on Letterboxd, we’re always logging and rating films we’ve been watching and occasionally Luke will do some pretty in-depth reviews, too.

Luke Kane: http://www.letterboxd.com/kanemutiny/
Damien Heath: http://www.letterboxd.com/jedikaos/

You can find Celluloid Junkies on FacebookTwitterInstagramYouTube and Pinterest.

Luke is also on Twitter, as is Damien

Thanks again for checking out Celluloid Junkies. Join us next time as we discuss one of the most notorious true crime stories ever committed to film, Tobe Hooper’s 1974 classic The Texas Chain Saw Massacre. Until then, don’t forget to check out the archives, or hit up our website.

This month we’re deep in the tropics, about to unload our six shooter into William Wyler’s 1940 film adaptation of W. Somerset Maugham’s play The Letter.

This podcast is non-profit and has been broadcast for educational purposes. Excerpts from the following material has been included to enhance the listener experience:

FILM
The Letter (1940) dir. William Wyler, USA

Read about the real Proudlock case, the inspiration for Maugham’s story, on the Victoria Institution’s website.

Two seminal discussions of film noir came in the 1970s, when the idea of noir as a genre, movement or style began: from British film critic Raymond Durgnat with Paint It Black: The Family Tree of Film Noir, and from American writer/director Paul Schrader with Notes on Film Noir.

William Wyler tops the list as the director with the highest number of Academy Award acting nominations and wins. Check out his closest competition (hint: they’re not very close).

Donato Totaro of Off Screen magazine wrote an in-depth exploration of the structure and openings of several seminal film noirs. It’s well worth the time to read. It’s in two parts, and The Letter is discussed in part one.

If you want to follow us on Letterboxd, we’re always logging and rating films we’ve been watching and occasionally Luke will do some pretty in-depth reviews, too.

Luke Kane: http://www.letterboxd.com/kanemutiny/
Damien Heath: http://www.letterboxd.com/jedikaos/

You can find Celluloid Junkies on FacebookTwitterInstagramYouTube and Pinterest.

Luke is also on Twitter, as is Damien

Thanks again for checking out Celluloid Junkies. Join us again in a month when we attend the funerals of some complete strangers and discuss the merits of Hal Ashby’s Harold and Maude. Until then, don’t forget to check out the archives, or hit up our website.

This month we are coming to you from the room above an old garage at a crumbling Hollywood mansion. We’re discussing a classic film that pushes the medium beyond the popular arts into excellence, Billy Wilder’s cynical, lurid masterpiece Sunset Boulevard.

This podcast is non-profit and has been broadcast for educational purposes. Excerpts from the following material has been included to enhance the listener experience:

FILM
Sunset Boulevard (1950) dir. Billy Wilder, USA

If you want to follow us on Letterboxd, we’re always logging and rating films we’ve been watching and occasionally Luke will do some pretty in-depth reviews, too.

Luke Kane: http://www.letterboxd.com/kanemutiny/
Damien Heath: http://www.letterboxd.com/jedikaos/

You can find Celluloid Junkies on FacebookTwitterInstagramYouTube and Pinterest.

Luke is also on Twitter, as is Damien

Thanks again for checking out Celluloid Junkies. Join us again in a month when we go even deeper into noir territory with William Wyler’s 1940 film The Letter. Until then, don’t forget to check out the archives, or hit up our website.

The world outside is scary right now, so sit back, relax and take a ride with us through simpler times with our 2019 year in review.

Join us as we look at the best and worst of the year that was, including our biggest disappointments, favourite performances, the most obscure films we watched in 2019, and of course our top five movies of the year.

Why does Paul Verhoeven’s Showgirls get a mention in our flashback to 2019? What is the greatest “yarn movie” of all-time? Was Joaquin Phoenix’s Joker better than Heath Ledger’s? What was the biggest cinematic news story of the year? You’ll have to listen to find out!

It’s great to be back, and we thank you for joining us on our journey.

This podcast is non-profit and has been broadcast for educational purposes. Excerpts from the following material has been included to enhance the listener experience:

FILM
Showgirls (1995) dir. Paul Verhoeven, USA
Conviction (2010) dir. Tony Goldwyn, USA
It Chapter Two (2019) dir. Andy Muschietti, USA
Marriage Story (2019) dir. Noah Baumbach, USA
Once Upon a Time in Hollywood (2019) dir. Quentin Tarantino, USA

MUSIC
Score from Little Women (2019) w: Alexandre Desplat

CLIPS
92nd Annual Academy Awards (2020)

This month we wanna talk to you, we wanna shampoo you, and we wanna find some sweet romance with Lisa Cholodenko’s 2011 Best Picture-nominated dramady The Kids Are All Right.

This podcast is non-profit and has been broadcast for educational purposes. Excerpts from the following material has been included to enhance the listener experience:

FILM
The Kids Are All Right (2011) dir. Lisa Cholodenko, USA

MUSIC
The Kids Are All Right” [Score] (2011)

Lisa Cholodenko’s highly personal, well reviewed and much nominated 2011 film was not without its detractors. Some gay and lesbian groups thought the film fell back on the oft-used trope of ‘gay woman turned straight by man’ (they may have missed the resolution to the film…), and they accused the film of showing a narrative they termed ‘homo-normative’ which, for many, wasn’t normal at all.

Among those who have written on these subjects, there’s Daisy Hernandez of Colorlines, Irin Carmon of Jezebel, Arifa Akbar of The Independent, TLM of The Lesbian Mafia, and Taj Paxton of GLAAD. Make up your own mind, though: we think it’s brilliant.

If you want to follow us on Letterboxd, we’re always logging and rating films we’ve been watching and occasionally Luke will do some pretty in-depth reviews, too.

Luke Kane: http://www.letterboxd.com/kanemutiny/
Damien Heath: http://www.letterboxd.com/jedikaos/

You can find Celluloid Junkies on FacebookTwitterInstagramYouTube and Pinterest.

Luke is also on Twitter, as is Damien

Thanks again for checking out Celluloid Junkies. Join us again in a month when we bring out our inner diva and discuss Billy Wilder’s 1950 masterpiece Sunset Boulevard. Until then, don’t forget to check out the archives, or hit up our website.

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