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Category: Podcast Episode

SPECIAL GUEST
Author Don Graham, Giant: Elizabeth Taylor, Rock Hudson, James Dean, Edna Ferber, and the Making of a Legendary American Film

This month we’re heading on down to Marfa, Texas, for George Stevens’ 1956 classic Giant. Best you be sittin’ comfortably, because our aim is to make this episode as long as the movie itself!

This podcast is non-profit and has been broadcast for educational purposes. Excerpts from the following material has been included to enhance the listener experience:

FILM
Giant (1956) dir. George Stevens, USA

MUSIC
Giant” (Score) (1956), w & p: Dimitri Tiomkin (available on Spotify)

SHOW NOTES

This month we are joined by Texan author Don Graham, described by the Dallas Morning News as the “premier scholar and critic on Texas literature, films and pop culture.” Don’s latest book is an exhaustive tome all about George Stevens’ masterpiece, published in 2018.

Don Graham holds a Ph.D and teaches the popular long-running class ‘Life and Literature in Texas’ at the University of Texas at Austin. He has previously taught classes on JFK and his assassination, and author Cormac McCarthy, among others.

He has written extensively for Texas Monthly, and you can find his writing archived on their website. You can also read an interview about the book at The New York Times – Tell us 5 things about your book: Bringing ‘Giant’ to the big screen – and a discussion of the book and the film at The Texas Observer website.

Don’s book is published by Macmillan imprint St. Martin’s Press, and you can buy it at Amazon in either Hardcover ($15.38) or Paperback ($18.63 – coming May 28th).

The Houston Chronicle took a look back at the movie around the time Don’s book was released, and it’s worth a read.

The Film Spectrum has written an entertaining and very thorough piece on the movie, which is surely worth checking out.

Likewise, our good friend Brian Eggert of Deep Focus Review has also recently tackled this epic as part of a Patreon request. While he wasn’t the film’s biggest fan, his erudite analysis always gives us a great platform for informed discussion.

If you want to follow us on Letterboxd, we’re always logging and rating films we’ve been watching and occasionally Luke will do some pretty in-depth reviews, too.

Luke Kane: http://www.letterboxd.com/kanemutiny/
Damien Heath: http://www.letterboxd.com/jedikaos/

You can find Celluloid Junkies on FacebookTwitterInstagramYouTube and PinterestLuke is also on Twitter, as is Damien.

Thanks again for checking out Celluloid Junkies. Next month we’ll both be your number-one-fans as we dissect one of the greatest screen adaptations of Stephen King’s writing. Until then, don’t forget to check out the archives, or hit up our website.

This month we’re stuck deep in no man’s land, about to engage in a combative debate about the merits of Stanley Kubrick’s early anti-war film Paths of Glory.

This podcast is non-profit and has been broadcast for educational purposes. Excerpts from the following material has been included to enhance the listener experience:

FILM
Paths of Glory (1957) dir. Stanley Kubrick, USA
Spartacus
 (1960) dir. Stanley Kubrick, USA
Full Metal Jacket (1987) dir. Stanley Kubrick, UK

MUSIC
“Army Dreamers” (1980), w & p: Kate Bush

SHOW NOTES

Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard, Thomas Gray, 1751

The boast of heraldry, the pomp of pow’r, 
         And all that beauty, all that wealth e’er gave, 
Awaits alike th’ inevitable hour. 
         The paths of glory lead but to the grave. 

Film Fisher online magazine acutely analyses the final sequence of Paths of Glory, noting its ability to return humanity to those dehumanised, speaking universal truths of love, loss and longing.

Cinephilia & Beyond also looks at the film in its current context, calling it “Stanley Kubrick’s first step towards cinema immortality”. This article is very thorough – there’s thoughts on the film, interviews with both Kubrick and co-producer James Harris, behind-the-scenes photos and more. It’s like the sunken treasure of Paths of Glory was finally found and placed onto this website. Check it out.

If for some reason you’ve never seen Paths of Glory – or, if you have and don’t yet own it – BUY! IT! NOW! There’s no excuse. Eureka Video added it to their Masters of Cinema collection (£13.99 on Blu-ray), and the Criterion Collection also did a marvellous restoration ($31.96 on Blu-ray, $23.96 on DVD). Both versions are sublime, so you can’t go wrong.

If you want to follow us on Letterboxd, we’re always logging and rating films we’ve been watching and occasionally Luke will do some pretty in-depth reviews, too.

Luke Kane: http://www.letterboxd.com/kanemutiny/
Damien Heath: http://www.letterboxd.com/jedikaos/

You can find Celluloid Junkies on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube and Pinterest. Luke is also on Twitter, as is Damien.

Thanks again for checking out Celluloid Junkies. We’ll see you next month deep in the heart of Texas as we spend some time with three beautiful people (Liz, James and Rock, oh my) and talk about George Stevens’ 1956 epic Giant.

Until then, don’t forget to check out the archives, or hit up our website.

It’s time for the junkies to sit down and reflect on the year in cinema. Favourite movies, moments and performances, the things we hated, our annual awards and our viewing stats.

We hope you enjoy this look back at the year that was!

This podcast is non-profit and has been broadcast for educational purposes. Excerpts from the following material has been included to enhance the listener experience:

FILM
Ben Is Back (2018) dir. Peter Hedges, USA
The Favourite (2018) dir. Yorgos Lanthimos, Ireland/UK/USA

MUSIC
“Shallow” from A Star Is Born (2018) w: Lady Gaga, Andrew Wyatt, Anthony Rossomando & Mark Ronson, p: Lady Gaga & Bradley Cooper

CLIPS
The Ellen Degeneres Show (2019) Interview with Kevin Hart

SPECIAL GUESTS
Emeritus Professor Neil Sinyard, University of Hull

Joined by Cassandra Kane, this month we’ve got our hard hats ready and we’re profiling James Bridges’ 1979 thriller The China Syndrome.

This podcast is non-profit and has been broadcast for educational purposes. Excerpts from the following material has been included to enhance the listener experience:

FILM
The Towering Inferno (1974) dir. John Guillermin, USA
The China Syndrome
 (1979) dir. James Bridges, USA

MUSIC
“Somewhere In Between (Theme From The China Syndrome)” (1979), w & p: Stephen Bishop

SHOW NOTES

This month we are joined by British author Neil Sinyard, an Emeritus Professor in Film Studies at the University of Hull who has devoted much of his career to writing about film and filmmakers. He has written an exhaustive number of books, including on Alfred Hitchcock, Steven Spielberg, Woody Allen, Mel Brooks, Nicolas Roeg, Jack Clayton, Fred Zinnemann and many others. He has also written essays for releases from both the Criterion Collection and Indicator, who released The China Syndrome on Blu-ray in the UK.

You can find more from Neil at Neil Sinyard on Film, and it’s well worth the read.

Finis Dunaway’s recent book Seeing Green: The Use and Abuse of American Environment Images looks in-depth at The China Syndrome – including its production and enduring legacy – from an iconographic perspective. It goes in-depth on nuclear industry and anti-nuke perceptions of the film, and the erroneous use of the cooling towers photos from Three Mile Island in future marketing campaigns.

If you want to know more about Three Mile Island, check out this comparison of the accident against Chernobyl and Fukushima.

If you want to follow us on Letterboxd, we’re always logging and rating films we’ve been watching and occasionally Luke will do some pretty in-depth reviews, too.

Luke Kane: http://www.letterboxd.com/kanemutiny/
Damien Heath: http://www.letterboxd.com/jedikaos/

You can find Celluloid Junkies on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube and Pinterest. Luke is also on Twitter, as is Damien.

Thanks again for checking out Celluloid Junkies. We’ll see you next month down in the trenches as we dissect Stanley Kubrick’s 1957 anti-war film Paths of Glory. Until then, don’t forget to check out the archives, or hit up our website.

SPECIAL GUESTS
Actress Julianne White, “Jackie” in Sexy Beast (2000)
Writer Brian Eggert, Deep Focus Review

This month we’re trying our best to relax poolside and enjoy the scorching summer sun while we discuss Jonathan Glazer’s directorial debut, the 2000 British crime film Sexy Beast.

This podcast is non-profit and has been broadcast for educational purposes. Excerpts from the following material has been included to enhance the listener experience:

FILM
Sexy Beast (2000) dir. Jonathan Glazer, UK

MUSIC
“Score” [OST] (2000), w & p: UNKLE / South

SHOW NOTES

We’ve got two very special guests this month!

First up is our very own Aussie-born actress Julianne White, who played the pivotal role of Jackie in Glazer’s first film. Julianne was kind enough to give us a bunch of her time to discuss Sexy Beast, and we’ve got stories about the audition process, filming, and her co-stars. Jackie even gives a very special tribute to the late Cavan Kendall, who played her husband Aitch in the film.

You can find Julianne on IMDB and IMDB Pro, or check out her official website to read more about her accomplished career which now spans more than three decades in film and television. Want more? You can always connect with Julianne on Twitter!

Our second special guest is film critic and essayist Brian Eggert, a film fanatic who began the website Deep Focus Review in 2007. Brian writes in-depth, studied and considered pieces on plenty of movies, and it was his incisive writing about Sexy Beast that persuaded us to reach out to him. Read his article on the film, and then connect with Brian on Twitter and Letterboxd and, if you love his work, donate on Patreon for exclusive work.

One thing that this film is renowned for is its dialogue. Sharp, witty, smart and direct, Scinto and Mellis’ script earned a British Independent Film Award for Best Screenplay. Writing instructor AJ Ferguson has taken a close look at one of the pivotal scenes in the film in his essay Sexy Beast – A Masters Course in Dialogue”.

If you want to follow us on Letterboxd, we’re always logging and rating films we’ve been watching and occasionally Luke will do some pretty in-depth reviews, too.

Luke Kane: http://www.letterboxd.com/kanemutiny/
Damien Heath: http://www.letterboxd.com/jedikaos/

You can find Celluloid Junkies on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube and Pinterest. Luke is also on Twitter, as is Damien.

Thanks again for checking out Celluloid Junkies. We’ll see you in the new year as we try to avert disaster when we sit down and discuss James Bridges’ 1979 film The China Syndrome. Until then, don’t forget to check out the archives, or hit up our website.

SPECIAL GUEST
Actress Lynne Griffin, “Clare” in Black Christmas (1974)
Writer Paul Corupe, Rue Morgue Magazine

Welcome to the first episode of season three of Celluloid Junkies!

This month we’re celebrating Halloween late but welcoming the festive season early with a profile of Bob Clark’s 1974 horror-thriller Black Christmas.

This podcast is non-profit and has been broadcast for educational purposes. Excerpts from the following material has been included to enhance the listener experience:

FILM
Black Christmas (1974) dir. Bob Clark, Canada
I Still Know What You Did Last Summer (1998) dir. Danny Cannon, USA

MUSIC
“Score” [OST] (1974), w & p: Carl Zittrer

SHOW NOTES

We’ve got two very special guests this month!

First up is Lynne Griffin, the first time we’ve interviewed an actor or actress from the movie we’re profiling. Lynne portrayed “professional virgin” Clare Harrison in Black Christmas. She was Billy’s first on-screen victim, and thanks to her swimming background was able to hold her breath for an impossibly long time in one of the film’s iconic lingering shots. Hear this and more stories in the funniest chat we’ve ever done!

You can find Lynne on IMDB and IMDB Pro, or check out her Wikipedia page to read more about her accomplished career which now spans more than four decades in film, TV and theatre.

Our second special guest is writer Paul Corupe, a contributor to horror favourite Rue Morgue magazine and the author of film-related articles in such books as “Recovering 1940s Horror Cinema: Traces of a Lost Decade”, “The Canadian Horror Film: Terror of the Soul” and “Yuletide Terror: Christmas Horror on Film and Television”.

Paul is also the managing editor of Spectacular Optical and the founder of Canuxploitation: Your Complete Guide to Canadian B-Film. In fact, you can even read the Canuxploitation review of Black Christmas!

If you want to do some further reading into gender in horror cinema, don’t look past Carol J. Clover’s seminal 1987 work, “Her Body, Himself: Gender in the Slasher Film”.

If you want to follow us on Letterboxd, we’re always logging and rating films we’ve been watching and occasionally Luke will do some pretty in-depth reviews, too.

Luke Kane: http://www.letterboxd.com/kanemutiny/
Damien Heath: http://www.letterboxd.com/jedikaos/

You can find Celluloid Junkies on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube and Pinterest. Luke is also on Twitter, as is Damien.

Thanks again for checking out Celluloid Junkies. We’ll see you next month when we try to relax poolside and discuss Jonathan Glazer’s 2000 British crime thriller Sexy Beast. F*@K. Until then, don’t forget to check out the archives, or hit up our website.

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