fbpx

Category: Podcast Episode

SPECIAL GUEST
Author Sue Russell, “Lethal Intent” (1992)

It’s the last episode of the second season of Celluloid Junkies, and this month we are taking to the highways of Florida with Patty Jenkins’ 2003 biographical crime drama “Monster”.

This podcast is non-profit and has been broadcast for educational purposes. Excerpts from the following material has been included to enhance the listener experience:

FILM
Monster (2003) dir. Patty Jenkins, USA
Aileen Wuornos: The Selling of a Serial Killer (1992) dir. Nick Broomfield, USA
Aileen: Life and Death of a Serial Killer (2003) dir. Nick Broomfield, USA

MUSIC
“Music From and Inspired by the Film Monster” [OST] (2003), w & p: BT
“Don’t Stop Believin'” (1981), w & p: Journey

ARTICLES
“More of a Monster Than Hollywood Could Picture” by Sue Russell, February 8th 2004
https://www.washingtonpost.com/archive/opinions/2004/02/08/more-of-a-monster-than-hollywood-could-picture/179c7282-5e25-4eb5-8980-c72aa90efdb0/?noredirect=on&utm_term=.c3e9bf83652a

SHOW NOTES

Our special guest this month is author Sue Russell, who in 1992 released “Lethal Intent” about the Aileen Wuornos case, which has since been updated with new information. It’s difficult to get a hold of (physical copies of the paperback are available through Amazon resellers starting at over $150), however several companies do distribute an eBook version which is affordable and well worth the investment.

You can buy the eBook at Kobo (EPub, US$5.99), Barnes & Noble (Nook, US$5.99) and Apple iBooks (EPub, US$5.99), although these may not necessarily be available outside of the United States (try your luck). Additional eBook purchasing options in the USA include Amazon and Google Play.

There’s also an audiobook version available on Audible (AU$52.20, or free with a 30-day trial, or redeemable from a credit with a paid subscription).

“Lethal Intent” is regarded as one of the best true crime books of all-time (The Examiner), with Sue’s attention to detail, objectivity and careful consideration of the facts raising it above the norm. We highly recommend the time spent reading this excellent book.

You can check out more of Sue’s work on her official website.

If you want to follow us on Letterboxd, we’re always logging and rating films we’ve been watching and occasionally Luke will do some pretty in-depth reviews, too. (Such as this one for “Monster”.)

Luke Kane: http://www.letterboxd.com/overbreakfast/
Damien Heath: http://www.letterboxd.com/jedikaos/

You can find Celluloid Junkies on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube and Pinterest. Luke is also on Twitter, as is Damien.

Thanks again for checking out Celluloid Junkies. We’ll see you in season three with a brand new Halloween episode very soon. Until then, don’t forget to check out the archives, or hit up our website. We’ve got some big things happening soon, so stay tuned!

This month we are smashing every lightbulb in the studio as we explore Terence Young’s 1967 domestic thriller “Wait Until Dark”.

This podcast is non-profit and has been broadcast for educational purposes. Excerpts from the following material has been included to enhance the listener experience:

FILM
The Birds (1963) dir. Alfred Hitchcock, USA
Wait Until Dark (1967) dir. Terence Young, USA
Panic Room (2002) dir. David Fincher, USA

SONGS
“Wait Until Dark” [score] (1967), w & p: Henry Mancini

SHOW NOTES

If you want to follow us on Letterboxd, we’re always logging and rating films we’ve been watching and occasionally Luke will do some pretty in-depth reviews, too.

Luke Kane: http://www.letterboxd.com/overbreakfast/
Damien Heath: http://www.letterboxd.com/jedikaos/

You can find Celluloid Junkies on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube and Pinterest. Luke is also on Twitter, as is Damien.

Thanks again for checking out Celluloid Junkies. We’ll see you next time with a close-up, in depth look at Patty Jenkins’ phenomenal serial killer biopic “Monster”.

This month we are going deep underground as we profile our first documentary of the series, the tense struggle against corporate greed and dangerous working conditions in Barbara Kopple’s 1976 film “Harlan County, USA”.

This podcast is non-profit and has been broadcast for educational purposes. Excerpts from the following material has been included to enhance the listener experience:

FILM
Harlan County, USA (1976) dir. Barbara Kopple, USA
Silkwood (1983) dir. Mike Nichols, USA

SONGS
“Which Side Are You On?” (1931) w: Florence Reece, p: Natalie Merchant
“Coal Miner’s Grave” (1976) w: Hazel Dickens, p: John Lilly

SHOW NOTES

If you want to follow us on Letterboxd, we’re always logging and rating films we’ve been watching and occasionally Luke will do some pretty in-depth reviews, too.

Luke Kane: http://www.letterboxd.com/overbreakfast/
Damien Heath: http://www.letterboxd.com/jedikaos/

You can find Celluloid Junkies on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube and Pinterest. Luke is also on Twitter, as is Damien.

Thanks again for checking out Celluloid Junkies. We’ll see you next time with a close-up, in depth look at Terence Young’s 1967 home invasion thriller “Wait Until Dark”.

SPECIAL GUEST
Author Samm Deighan, “Lost Girls: The Phantasmagorical Cinema of Jean Rollin” and an upcoming book on Fritz Lang’s M; co-host of the Daughters of Darkness Podcast; Associate Editor of Diabolique Magazine; contributor to Senses of Cinema Magazine

This month we are on the hunt for a serial killer in Fritz Lang’s 1931 German thriller “M”.

This podcast is non-profit and has been broadcast for educational purposes. Excerpts from the following material has been included to enhance the listener experience:

FILM
M [English Language Version] (1931) dir. Fritz Lang, Germany

SONGS
“The Main Scene” from Nosferatu, eine Symphonie des Grauens (1922) w: Hans Erdmann
“In the Hall of the Mountain King” (Suite No. 1, Op. 46) from Peer Gynt (1875) w: Edvard Grieg, p: Peter Lorre
“Supersymmetry” (2013) w & p: Arcade Fire
“Silo Attack” from A Quiet Place: OST (2018) w: Marco Beltrami

SHOW NOTES

If you want to follow us on Letterboxd, we’re always logging and rating films we’ve been watching and occasionally Luke will do some pretty in-depth reviews, too.

Luke Kane: http://www.letterboxd.com/overbreakfast/
Damien Heath: http://www.letterboxd.com/jedikaos/

You can find Celluloid Junkies on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube and Pinterest. Luke is also on Twitter, as is Damien.

Thanks again for checking out Celluloid Junkies. We’ll see you next time with a close-up, in depth look at Barbara Kopple’s dramatic, tense and inspiring Academy Award-winning documentary “Harlan County, U.S.A.”.

This month we are profiling Lynne Ramsay’s 2011 mesmeric domestic drama “We Need to Talk About Kevin”.

This episode was recorded before the February 14th school shooting at Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida. As such, some research and statistics stated during the show do not reflect the severity of this school shooting. Our thoughts are with all of the victims, their families and friends.

See Never Again MSD for information on the #NeverAgain movement, created by students of Stoneman Douglas High School who wish for no students to experience what they went through in the future. The “March For Our Lives” rally is being held on March 24th, 2018 in Washington, D.C.

This podcast is non-profit and has been broadcast for educational purposes. Excerpts from the following material has been included to enhance the listener experience:

FILM
We Need to Talk About Kevin (2011) dir. Lynne Ramsay, USA

SONGS
“I Don’t Like Mondays” (2001) w: Bob Geldof, p: Tori Amos

SHOW NOTES

Poster Design

Design is one of the recurring themes of “We Need to Talk About Kevin”. Eva’s sparse, childless life decisions are by design; her work is big on design in many ways, including the literal; and the movie takes these themes and transfers them to not only the screen, but also the publicity materials used in its promotion. Few recent movies have received quite as many markedly different poster designs as this film, and here are a selection of just a few of the best.

The reviews and awards poster.

The Kevin-centric poster.

This and the next poster use Neue Helvetica 97 Black Condensed, a blockletter variant of the world’s most popular font. Notice the use of colour, and its direct contrast to the next poster. The blue hues are similar to those seen during the film’s climax.

The Eva-centric variant of the same poster.

Notice that the first two quotes are the same as on the last poster, but in this variation the third quote is changed from one about Ezra Miller to one about Tilda Swinton. The colour, obviously, has been altered to the dramatic red tones that run throughout the movie when modern day Eva is on screen.

If you want to follow us on Letterboxd, we’re always logging and rating films we’ve been watching and occasionally Luke will do some pretty in-depth reviews, too.

Luke Kane: http://www.letterboxd.com/overbreakfast/
Damien Heath: http://www.letterboxd.com/jedikaos/

You can find Celluloid Junkies on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube and Pinterest. Luke is also on Twitter, as is Damien.

Thanks again for checking out Celluloid Junkies. We’ll see you next time with a close-up, in depth look at Fritz Lang’s 1931 German-language masterpiece “M”.

We’re doing something we haven’t done before as we take a look back at 2017. We’ll review each of the Best Picture nominees for next month’s Academy Awards, each list our five favourite films of 2017, and each give away 10 awards in the inaugural Celluloid Junkies Oscars Preview!

This podcast is non-profit and has been broadcast for educational purposes. Excerpts from the following material has been included to enhance the listener experience:

FILM
Silent Night, Deadly Night (1984) dir. Charles Sellier Jr., USA
The Silence of the Lambs (1991) dir. Jonathan Demme, USA

SONGS
“American Girl” (1977) w: Tom Petty, p: Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers

SHOW NOTES

If you want to follow us on Letterboxd, we’re always logging and rating films we’ve been watching and occasionally Luke will do some pretty in-depth reviews, too.

Luke Kane: http://www.letterboxd.com/overbreakfast/
Damien Heath: http://www.letterboxd.com/jedikaos/

You can find Celluloid Junkies on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube and Pinterest. Luke is also on Twitter, as is Damien.

Scroll to top