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Category: Podcast Episode

SPECIAL GUESTS
Emeritus Professor Neil Sinyard, University of Hull

Joined by Cassandra Kane, this month we’ve got our hard hats ready and we’re profiling James Bridges’ 1979 thriller The China Syndrome.

This podcast is non-profit and has been broadcast for educational purposes. Excerpts from the following material has been included to enhance the listener experience:

FILM
The Towering Inferno (1974) dir. John Guillermin, USA
The China Syndrome
 (1979) dir. James Bridges, USA

MUSIC
“Somewhere In Between (Theme From The China Syndrome)” (1979), w & p: Stephen Bishop

SHOW NOTES

This month we are joined by British author Neil Sinyard, an Emeritus Professor in Film Studies at the University of Hull who has devoted much of his career to writing about film and filmmakers. He has written an exhaustive number of books, including on Alfred Hitchcock, Steven Spielberg, Woody Allen, Mel Brooks, Nicolas Roeg, Jack Clayton, Fred Zinnemann and many others. He has also written essays for releases from both the Criterion Collection and Indicator, who released The China Syndrome on Blu-ray in the UK.

You can find more from Neil at Neil Sinyard on Film, and it’s well worth the read.

Finis Dunaway’s recent book Seeing Green: The Use and Abuse of American Environment Images looks in-depth at The China Syndrome – including its production and enduring legacy – from an iconographic perspective. It goes in-depth on nuclear industry and anti-nuke perceptions of the film, and the erroneous use of the cooling towers photos from Three Mile Island in future marketing campaigns.

If you want to know more about Three Mile Island, check out this comparison of the accident against Chernobyl and Fukushima.

If you want to follow us on Letterboxd, we’re always logging and rating films we’ve been watching and occasionally Luke will do some pretty in-depth reviews, too.

Luke Kane: http://www.letterboxd.com/kanemutiny/
Damien Heath: http://www.letterboxd.com/jedikaos/

You can find Celluloid Junkies on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube and Pinterest. Luke is also on Twitter, as is Damien.

Thanks again for checking out Celluloid Junkies. We’ll see you next month down in the trenches as we dissect Stanley Kubrick’s 1957 anti-war film Paths of Glory. Until then, don’t forget to check out the archives, or hit up our website.

SPECIAL GUESTS
Actress Julianne White, “Jackie” in Sexy Beast (2000)
Writer Brian Eggert, Deep Focus Review

This month we’re trying our best to relax poolside and enjoy the scorching summer sun while we discuss Jonathan Glazer’s directorial debut, the 2000 British crime film Sexy Beast.

This podcast is non-profit and has been broadcast for educational purposes. Excerpts from the following material has been included to enhance the listener experience:

FILM
Sexy Beast (2000) dir. Jonathan Glazer, UK

MUSIC
“Score” [OST] (2000), w & p: UNKLE / South

SHOW NOTES

We’ve got two very special guests this month!

First up is our very own Aussie-born actress Julianne White, who played the pivotal role of Jackie in Glazer’s first film. Julianne was kind enough to give us a bunch of her time to discuss Sexy Beast, and we’ve got stories about the audition process, filming, and her co-stars. Jackie even gives a very special tribute to the late Cavan Kendall, who played her husband Aitch in the film.

You can find Julianne on IMDB and IMDB Pro, or check out her official website to read more about her accomplished career which now spans more than three decades in film and television. Want more? You can always connect with Julianne on Twitter!

Our second special guest is film critic and essayist Brian Eggert, a film fanatic who began the website Deep Focus Review in 2007. Brian writes in-depth, studied and considered pieces on plenty of movies, and it was his incisive writing about Sexy Beast that persuaded us to reach out to him. Read his article on the film, and then connect with Brian on Twitter and Letterboxd and, if you love his work, donate on Patreon for exclusive work.

One thing that this film is renowned for is its dialogue. Sharp, witty, smart and direct, Scinto and Mellis’ script earned a British Independent Film Award for Best Screenplay. Writing instructor AJ Ferguson has taken a close look at one of the pivotal scenes in the film in his essay Sexy Beast – A Masters Course in Dialogue”.

If you want to follow us on Letterboxd, we’re always logging and rating films we’ve been watching and occasionally Luke will do some pretty in-depth reviews, too.

Luke Kane: http://www.letterboxd.com/kanemutiny/
Damien Heath: http://www.letterboxd.com/jedikaos/

You can find Celluloid Junkies on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube and Pinterest. Luke is also on Twitter, as is Damien.

Thanks again for checking out Celluloid Junkies. We’ll see you in the new year as we try to avert disaster when we sit down and discuss James Bridges’ 1979 film The China Syndrome. Until then, don’t forget to check out the archives, or hit up our website.

SPECIAL GUEST
Actress Lynne Griffin, “Clare” in Black Christmas (1974)
Writer Paul Corupe, Rue Morgue Magazine

Welcome to the first episode of season three of Celluloid Junkies!

This month we’re celebrating Halloween late but welcoming the festive season early with a profile of Bob Clark’s 1974 horror-thriller Black Christmas.

This podcast is non-profit and has been broadcast for educational purposes. Excerpts from the following material has been included to enhance the listener experience:

FILM
Black Christmas (1974) dir. Bob Clark, Canada
I Still Know What You Did Last Summer (1998) dir. Danny Cannon, USA

MUSIC
“Score” [OST] (1974), w & p: Carl Zittrer

SHOW NOTES

We’ve got two very special guests this month!

First up is Lynne Griffin, the first time we’ve interviewed an actor or actress from the movie we’re profiling. Lynne portrayed “professional virgin” Clare Harrison in Black Christmas. She was Billy’s first on-screen victim, and thanks to her swimming background was able to hold her breath for an impossibly long time in one of the film’s iconic lingering shots. Hear this and more stories in the funniest chat we’ve ever done!

You can find Lynne on IMDB and IMDB Pro, or check out her Wikipedia page to read more about her accomplished career which now spans more than four decades in film, TV and theatre.

Our second special guest is writer Paul Corupe, a contributor to horror favourite Rue Morgue magazine and the author of film-related articles in such books as “Recovering 1940s Horror Cinema: Traces of a Lost Decade”, “The Canadian Horror Film: Terror of the Soul” and “Yuletide Terror: Christmas Horror on Film and Television”.

Paul is also the managing editor of Spectacular Optical and the founder of Canuxploitation: Your Complete Guide to Canadian B-Film. In fact, you can even read the Canuxploitation review of Black Christmas!

If you want to do some further reading into gender in horror cinema, don’t look past Carol J. Clover’s seminal 1987 work, “Her Body, Himself: Gender in the Slasher Film”.

If you want to follow us on Letterboxd, we’re always logging and rating films we’ve been watching and occasionally Luke will do some pretty in-depth reviews, too.

Luke Kane: http://www.letterboxd.com/kanemutiny/
Damien Heath: http://www.letterboxd.com/jedikaos/

You can find Celluloid Junkies on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube and Pinterest. Luke is also on Twitter, as is Damien.

Thanks again for checking out Celluloid Junkies. We’ll see you next month when we try to relax poolside and discuss Jonathan Glazer’s 2000 British crime thriller Sexy Beast. F*@K. Until then, don’t forget to check out the archives, or hit up our website.

SPECIAL GUEST
Author Sue Russell, “Lethal Intent” (1992)

It’s the last episode of the second season of Celluloid Junkies, and this month we are taking to the highways of Florida with Patty Jenkins’ 2003 biographical crime drama “Monster”.

This podcast is non-profit and has been broadcast for educational purposes. Excerpts from the following material has been included to enhance the listener experience:

FILM
Monster (2003) dir. Patty Jenkins, USA
Aileen Wuornos: The Selling of a Serial Killer (1992) dir. Nick Broomfield, USA
Aileen: Life and Death of a Serial Killer (2003) dir. Nick Broomfield, USA

MUSIC
“Music From and Inspired by the Film Monster” [OST] (2003), w & p: BT
“Don’t Stop Believin'” (1981), w & p: Journey

ARTICLES
“More of a Monster Than Hollywood Could Picture” by Sue Russell, February 8th 2004
https://www.washingtonpost.com/archive/opinions/2004/02/08/more-of-a-monster-than-hollywood-could-picture/179c7282-5e25-4eb5-8980-c72aa90efdb0/?noredirect=on&utm_term=.c3e9bf83652a

SHOW NOTES

Our special guest this month is author Sue Russell, who in 1992 released “Lethal Intent” about the Aileen Wuornos case, which has since been updated with new information. It’s difficult to get a hold of (physical copies of the paperback are available through Amazon resellers starting at over $150), however several companies do distribute an eBook version which is affordable and well worth the investment.

You can buy the eBook at Kobo (EPub, US$5.99), Barnes & Noble (Nook, US$5.99) and Apple iBooks (EPub, US$5.99), although these may not necessarily be available outside of the United States (try your luck). Additional eBook purchasing options in the USA include Amazon and Google Play.

There’s also an audiobook version available on Audible (AU$52.20, or free with a 30-day trial, or redeemable from a credit with a paid subscription).

“Lethal Intent” is regarded as one of the best true crime books of all-time (The Examiner), with Sue’s attention to detail, objectivity and careful consideration of the facts raising it above the norm. We highly recommend the time spent reading this excellent book.

You can check out more of Sue’s work on her official website.

If you want to follow us on Letterboxd, we’re always logging and rating films we’ve been watching and occasionally Luke will do some pretty in-depth reviews, too. (Such as this one for “Monster”.)

Luke Kane: http://www.letterboxd.com/overbreakfast/
Damien Heath: http://www.letterboxd.com/jedikaos/

You can find Celluloid Junkies on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube and Pinterest. Luke is also on Twitter, as is Damien.

Thanks again for checking out Celluloid Junkies. We’ll see you in season three with a brand new Halloween episode very soon. Until then, don’t forget to check out the archives, or hit up our website. We’ve got some big things happening soon, so stay tuned!

This month we are smashing every lightbulb in the studio as we explore Terence Young’s 1967 domestic thriller “Wait Until Dark”.

This podcast is non-profit and has been broadcast for educational purposes. Excerpts from the following material has been included to enhance the listener experience:

FILM
The Birds (1963) dir. Alfred Hitchcock, USA
Wait Until Dark (1967) dir. Terence Young, USA
Panic Room (2002) dir. David Fincher, USA

SONGS
“Wait Until Dark” [score] (1967), w & p: Henry Mancini

SHOW NOTES

If you want to follow us on Letterboxd, we’re always logging and rating films we’ve been watching and occasionally Luke will do some pretty in-depth reviews, too.

Luke Kane: http://www.letterboxd.com/overbreakfast/
Damien Heath: http://www.letterboxd.com/jedikaos/

You can find Celluloid Junkies on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube and Pinterest. Luke is also on Twitter, as is Damien.

Thanks again for checking out Celluloid Junkies. We’ll see you next time with a close-up, in depth look at Patty Jenkins’ phenomenal serial killer biopic “Monster”.

This month we are going deep underground as we profile our first documentary of the series, the tense struggle against corporate greed and dangerous working conditions in Barbara Kopple’s 1976 film “Harlan County, USA”.

This podcast is non-profit and has been broadcast for educational purposes. Excerpts from the following material has been included to enhance the listener experience:

FILM
Harlan County, USA (1976) dir. Barbara Kopple, USA
Silkwood (1983) dir. Mike Nichols, USA

SONGS
“Which Side Are You On?” (1931) w: Florence Reece, p: Natalie Merchant
“Coal Miner’s Grave” (1976) w: Hazel Dickens, p: John Lilly

SHOW NOTES

If you want to follow us on Letterboxd, we’re always logging and rating films we’ve been watching and occasionally Luke will do some pretty in-depth reviews, too.

Luke Kane: http://www.letterboxd.com/overbreakfast/
Damien Heath: http://www.letterboxd.com/jedikaos/

You can find Celluloid Junkies on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube and Pinterest. Luke is also on Twitter, as is Damien.

Thanks again for checking out Celluloid Junkies. We’ll see you next time with a close-up, in depth look at Terence Young’s 1967 home invasion thriller “Wait Until Dark”.

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