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Year: 2019

This month we wanna talk to you, we wanna shampoo you, and we wanna find some sweet romance with Lisa Cholodenko’s 2011 Best Picture-nominated dramady The Kids Are All Right.

This podcast is non-profit and has been broadcast for educational purposes. Excerpts from the following material has been included to enhance the listener experience:

FILM
The Kids Are All Right (2011) dir. Lisa Cholodenko, USA

MUSIC
The Kids Are All Right” [Score] (2011)

Lisa Cholodenko’s highly personal, well reviewed and much nominated 2011 film was not without its detractors. Some gay and lesbian groups thought the film fell back on the oft-used trope of ‘gay woman turned straight by man’ (they may have missed the resolution to the film…), and they accused the film of showing a narrative they termed ‘homo-normative’ which, for many, wasn’t normal at all.

Among those who have written on these subjects, there’s Daisy Hernandez of Colorlines, Irin Carmon of Jezebel, Arifa Akbar of The Independent, TLM of The Lesbian Mafia, and Taj Paxton of GLAAD. Make up your own mind, though: we think it’s brilliant.

If you want to follow us on Letterboxd, we’re always logging and rating films we’ve been watching and occasionally Luke will do some pretty in-depth reviews, too.

Luke Kane: http://www.letterboxd.com/kanemutiny/
Damien Heath: http://www.letterboxd.com/jedikaos/

You can find Celluloid Junkies on FacebookTwitterInstagramYouTube and Pinterest.

Luke is also on Twitter, as is Damien

Thanks again for checking out Celluloid Junkies. Join us again in a month when we bring out our inner diva and discuss Billy Wilder’s 1950 masterpiece Sunset Boulevard. Until then, don’t forget to check out the archives, or hit up our website.

SPECIAL GUESTS: Actress Karen Robson, Picnic at Hanging Rock and Author Helen Goltz, “No Picnic at Hanging Rock”

This month we’re embarking on a school excursion to check out a cinematic marvel – Peter Weir’s hypnotic 1975 mystery Picnic at Hanging Rock. We return sharply at 8 o’clock, so don’t wander too far from the group and we’re sure nothing will go wrong…

This podcast is non-profit and has been broadcast for educational purposes. Excerpts from the following material has been included to enhance the listener experience:

FILM
Picnic at Hanging Rock (1975) dir. Peter Weir, Australia
Razorback (1984) dir. Russell Mulcahy, Australia
Wolf Creek (2005) dir. Greg McLean, Australia

MUSIC
Picnic at Hanging Rock” [Score] (1975)

Our special guests this month include actress Karen Robson, who portrayed returning girl Irma in Picnic at Hanging Rock. Karen left acting soon after her role as Irma, and is a partner in law firm Pryor Cashman LLP based in Los Angeles, working primarily in film finance. She was kind enough to give us some of her time for a very informative and entertaining interview.

Our other special guest is author Helen Goltz, who wrote the 2017 non-fiction account of the film’s production, “No Picnic at Hanging Rock”. Helen is also the author of nine fiction novels and a further six non-fiction books, which are all available through her publisher, Atlas Productions. Helen was kind enough to join us and give insights into the production of the film, as well as famous myths surrounding the project.

If you only check out one resource regarding Picnic at Hanging Rock, make sure it’s the online collection from the National Film and Sound Archive. There is some truly stunning memorabilia from the film displayed in the collection, which is accessible – for free – to anybody interested.

Fifty years after the book was published, Australia’s Sydney Morning Herald took a look back at the story of its writing. It’s an interesting read that gives you some background into the life and creative process of Joan Lindsay.

Little White Lies continues to set itself apart from the competition by covering little-known and forgotten films. Go with them on a crazy journey as they look at the original ending to the novel – complete with crab creatures and black holes.

Want to visit Hanging Rock or Appleyard College and check for yourself if there’s anything out of the ordinary? Check out the real shooting locations used in the film.

Check out Keith Connelly’s 1981 article about the Australian New Wave written for The New York Times. It’s an enlightening look at how the country valued its output, possibly being proud of its cinema for the first time in its history.

If you want to follow us on Letterboxd, we’re always logging and rating films we’ve been watching and occasionally Luke will do some pretty in-depth reviews, too.

Luke Kane: http://www.letterboxd.com/kanemutiny/
Damien Heath: http://www.letterboxd.com/jedikaos/

You can find Celluloid Junkies on FacebookTwitterInstagramYouTube and Pinterest.

Luke is also on Twitter, as is Damien

Thanks again for checking out Celluloid Junkies. Join us again in a month when we wanna talk to you, we wanna shampoo you, and we look at Lisa Cholodenko’s 2010 drama The Kids Are All Right. Until then, don’t forget to check out the archives, or hit up our website.

Put on your Liberace records and make sure your little ceramic penguins all face due south because this month we’re looking at one of the all-time great thrillers, Rob Reiner’s 1990 dirty bird Misery.

This podcast is non-profit and has been broadcast for educational purposes. Excerpts from the following material has been included to enhance the listener experience:

FILM
Misery (1990) dir. Rob Reiner, USA

MUSIC
Misery” [Score] (1990), w: Marc Shaiman

Take a look at some of the differences between King’s novel and Reiner’s film, what works and what doesn’t, with author Lucy V Hay.

Then take a look at Vulture’s list of all Stephen King adaptations ranked from worst-to-best. (Misery ranks fifth, so what’s above it?)

William Goldman further adapted King’s novel and his own film in 2015 for a Broadway play. The stars were Bruce Willis as Paul Sheldon and Laurie Metcalf as Annie Wilkes, but from all reports it failed to deliver and lasted for just over three months.

Misery is a story about fan culture written over 30 years ago, but as Luke states it may be more relevant than ever today. Rolling Stone magazine took a look at this idea and came to the same conclusion:

The fears [Misery] incites have only grown more potent as celebrity access for the adoring, always-on(line) masses becomes more readily available. Make Paul Sheldon a Vine star set to retire his account and the story pretty much carries the same weight. Misery is a stalker thriller, a horror film about obsession, but it’s also a worst-case-scenario cautionary tale that highlights the discrepancies between a person’s public and private life in a universal way — whether you’re an avid Instagrammer, a Twitter superstar with four million followers or simply a famous novelist with a rabid Number One Fan.

Hazel Cills, Rolling Stone Magazine, November 30th 2015

Morbidly Beautiful tackles some of those same things in their well-written article on the movie, which goes a bit more in-depth on the motivations of both Paul Sheldon as captive and Annie Wilkes as captor.

If you’re interested in delving deeper into the psyche, the psychoanalysis and the medical classification of Annie Wilkes, you can do worse than to read both Cklara Moradian’s clinical assessment and Gustavo Costa’s thesis on the topic.

As with all discussions on the topic of Reiner’s thriller, we come to The Scene. It’ll stay with you forever, so why not embrace that harsh reality and just read more about it. Scriptophobia explores the best special effects sequences in the history of genre cinema and obviously believes Misery‘s hobbling scene is one of them; meanwhile, CinemaBlend goes over the history of why and how the scene was changed so dramatically from the book to the film.

Check out the various times that James Caan and Kathy Bates have reunited, which demonstrates It’s Only A Movie. They did it for NBC’s The Today Show and also for Entertainment Weekly.

James Caan and Kathy Bates reunited 25 years after filming Rob Reiner’s thriller Misery. Photo Credit: Entertainment Weekly

Finally, we get to one of our favourite pieces of contemporary Misery fan culture, wherein a Crazy Chick Flips Out in Barnes & Noble. Read the story behind the video, or better yet just enjoy the whole thing again.

If you want to follow us on Letterboxd, we’re always logging and rating films we’ve been watching and occasionally Luke will do some pretty in-depth reviews, too.

Luke Kane: http://www.letterboxd.com/kanemutiny/
Damien Heath: http://www.letterboxd.com/jedikaos/

You can find Celluloid Junkies on FacebookTwitterInstagramYouTube and Pinterest.

Luke is also on Twitter, as is Damien

Thanks again for checking out Celluloid Junkies. Join us again in a month when we’ll be diving head-first into Peter Weir’s beautiful, lyrical 1975 Australian mystery film Picnic at Hanging Rock. Until then, don’t forget to check out the archives, or hit up our website.

SPECIAL GUEST
Producer Frank Murray, First Reformed

This week we’ve got a treat as we’re looking at one of the best films of last year: Paul Schrader’s unnerving character study First Reformed. Guest host Cassandra Kane is back with the Junkies as we sit down with the film’s producer, Frank Murray.

This podcast is non-profit and has been broadcast for educational purposes. Excerpts from the following material has been included to enhance the listener experience:

FILM
First Reformed (2018) dir. Paul Schrader, USA

MUSIC
First Reformed” (Score) (2018), w & p: Lustmord
“Are You Washed in the Blood of the Lamb” (1878), w: Elisha A. Hoffman
“Who’s Gonna Stand Up?” [Orchestral Version] (2014), w & p: Neil Young

SHOW NOTES

This week we were lucky enough to sit down with Frank Murray, who is the producer on Paul Schrader’s First Reformed. Murray started in the industry as a production accountant, moved into production management and has more recently been working as a producer in his own right. His credits as producer include Ang Lee’s Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk (2016) and Todd Haynes’ Wonderstruck (2017).

Frank talks to us about how he got into the industry, his previous roles and what he really enjoys doing; working intimately with one of Hollywood’s most revered filmmakers; the genesis of many of the decisions we see on-screen in First Reformed; the current state of the industry and the uphill battle to produce meaningful films; and why the best boy (and every other role on-set) is just as important as the producer.

Want to know how much Paul Schrader loved working with Frank? Check out Filmmaker Magazine’s interview with the director. Paul needed a “producer to protect [him]”, and that’s just what Frank did – in the end, Schrader described him as “indispensable”.

Filmmaker Magazine also posed five questions to the director soon after the film’s festival run. He talks about the inspiration for the film’s story, and his personal cinematic inspirations for the film’s look, among other things.

If you’re like us and you just want to keep learning about this movie, check out this series of brilliantly-written articles and reviews:

Let’s leave this week’s Show Notes with a quote from Schrader himself about the film’s distribution. When films are launching to more than a billion dollars in a week, where does that leave both the little guys & girls and the Hollywood legends who aren’t chasing the quick buck?

This was taken verbatim from Paul Schrader’s Facebook post on March 3rd, when the Netflix-at-the-Oscars debate was in full swing.

“Distribution models evolve. The notion of squeezing 200+ people into a dark unventilated space to see a flickering image was created by exhibition economics, not any notion of the ‘theatrical experience’. Netflix allows many financially marginal films to have a platform and that’s a good thing. But here’s my query: it involves First Reformed.

“First Reformed was sold at a bargain price to A24 out of the Toronto FF. Netflix, which could have snapped it up as easily as it swats a fly on its ass, passed. As did Amazon. As did Sony Classics and Focus. But A24 saw a commercial path for this austere aesthetic film. As a result First Reformed found a life. A24 rolled it out through festivals and screenings from 2017 to 2018. And it survived. Not a big money maker but profitable for A24 and a jewel in their crown. Would First Reformed have found this public acceptance if Netflix [had] scooped it up (at say twice the price A24 payed) and dumped it into its larder? Perhaps Bird Box and Kissing Booth can fight their way through the vast sea of Netflix product to find popular acceptance, but First Reformed? Unlikely. Relegated to film esoterica.”

Paul Schrader, March 3rd 2019

If you want to follow us on Letterboxd, we’re always logging and rating films we’ve been watching and occasionally Luke will do some pretty in-depth reviews, too.

Luke Kane: http://www.letterboxd.com/kanemutiny/
Damien Heath: http://www.letterboxd.com/jedikaos/

You can find Celluloid Junkies on FacebookTwitterInstagramYouTube and PinterestLuke is also on Twitter, as is Damien.

Thanks again for checking out Celluloid Junkies. Join us again in a week’s time when we’ll both be your number-one-fans as we dissect one of the greatest screen adaptations of Stephen King’s writing. Until then, don’t forget to check out the archives, or hit up our website.

SPECIAL GUEST
Author Don Graham, Giant: Elizabeth Taylor, Rock Hudson, James Dean, Edna Ferber, and the Making of a Legendary American Film

This month we’re heading on down to Marfa, Texas, for George Stevens’ 1956 classic Giant. Best you be sittin’ comfortably, because our aim is to make this episode as long as the movie itself!

This podcast is non-profit and has been broadcast for educational purposes. Excerpts from the following material has been included to enhance the listener experience:

FILM
Giant (1956) dir. George Stevens, USA

MUSIC
Giant” (Score) (1956), w & p: Dimitri Tiomkin (available on Spotify)

SHOW NOTES

This month we are joined by Texan author Don Graham, described by the Dallas Morning News as the “premier scholar and critic on Texas literature, films and pop culture.” Don’s latest book is an exhaustive tome all about George Stevens’ masterpiece, published in 2018.

Don Graham holds a Ph.D and teaches the popular long-running class ‘Life and Literature in Texas’ at the University of Texas at Austin. He has previously taught classes on JFK and his assassination, and author Cormac McCarthy, among others.

He has written extensively for Texas Monthly, and you can find his writing archived on their website. You can also read an interview about the book at The New York Times – Tell us 5 things about your book: Bringing ‘Giant’ to the big screen – and a discussion of the book and the film at The Texas Observer website.

Don’s book is published by Macmillan imprint St. Martin’s Press, and you can buy it at Amazon in either Hardcover ($15.38) or Paperback ($18.63 – coming May 28th).

The Houston Chronicle took a look back at the movie around the time Don’s book was released, and it’s worth a read.

The Film Spectrum has written an entertaining and very thorough piece on the movie, which is surely worth checking out.

Likewise, our good friend Brian Eggert of Deep Focus Review has also recently tackled this epic as part of a Patreon request. While he wasn’t the film’s biggest fan, his erudite analysis always gives us a great platform for informed discussion.

If you want to follow us on Letterboxd, we’re always logging and rating films we’ve been watching and occasionally Luke will do some pretty in-depth reviews, too.

Luke Kane: http://www.letterboxd.com/kanemutiny/
Damien Heath: http://www.letterboxd.com/jedikaos/

You can find Celluloid Junkies on FacebookTwitterInstagramYouTube and PinterestLuke is also on Twitter, as is Damien.

Thanks again for checking out Celluloid Junkies. Next month we’ll both be your number-one-fans as we dissect one of the greatest screen adaptations of Stephen King’s writing. Until then, don’t forget to check out the archives, or hit up our website.

This month we’re stuck deep in no man’s land, about to engage in a combative debate about the merits of Stanley Kubrick’s early anti-war film Paths of Glory.

This podcast is non-profit and has been broadcast for educational purposes. Excerpts from the following material has been included to enhance the listener experience:

FILM
Paths of Glory (1957) dir. Stanley Kubrick, USA
Spartacus
 (1960) dir. Stanley Kubrick, USA
Full Metal Jacket (1987) dir. Stanley Kubrick, UK

MUSIC
“Army Dreamers” (1980), w & p: Kate Bush

SHOW NOTES

Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard, Thomas Gray, 1751

The boast of heraldry, the pomp of pow’r, 
         And all that beauty, all that wealth e’er gave, 
Awaits alike th’ inevitable hour. 
         The paths of glory lead but to the grave. 

Film Fisher online magazine acutely analyses the final sequence of Paths of Glory, noting its ability to return humanity to those dehumanised, speaking universal truths of love, loss and longing.

Cinephilia & Beyond also looks at the film in its current context, calling it “Stanley Kubrick’s first step towards cinema immortality”. This article is very thorough – there’s thoughts on the film, interviews with both Kubrick and co-producer James Harris, behind-the-scenes photos and more. It’s like the sunken treasure of Paths of Glory was finally found and placed onto this website. Check it out.

If for some reason you’ve never seen Paths of Glory – or, if you have and don’t yet own it – BUY! IT! NOW! There’s no excuse. Eureka Video added it to their Masters of Cinema collection (£13.99 on Blu-ray), and the Criterion Collection also did a marvellous restoration ($31.96 on Blu-ray, $23.96 on DVD). Both versions are sublime, so you can’t go wrong.

If you want to follow us on Letterboxd, we’re always logging and rating films we’ve been watching and occasionally Luke will do some pretty in-depth reviews, too.

Luke Kane: http://www.letterboxd.com/kanemutiny/
Damien Heath: http://www.letterboxd.com/jedikaos/

You can find Celluloid Junkies on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube and Pinterest. Luke is also on Twitter, as is Damien.

Thanks again for checking out Celluloid Junkies. We’ll see you next month deep in the heart of Texas as we spend some time with three beautiful people (Liz, James and Rock, oh my) and talk about George Stevens’ 1956 epic Giant.

Until then, don’t forget to check out the archives, or hit up our website.

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