Category: Show Notes

He could have been James Bond, but British cinema’s most notorious hellraiser lost focus and died at the age of 61, leaving Ridley Scott to piece together his final performance as the slave dealer Proximo in Gladiator (2000) using outtakes, body doubles and CGI. Such was the affection for Oliver Reed among BAFTA members, however, that he was posthumously nominated for the best supporting actor award. But the public had come to think of him as a drunk making a boorish spectacle of himself on chat shows and Channel Four forums like After Dark. “Let’s face it”, Reed told critic Roger Ebert around the time he made Women in Love (1969). “There has to be somebody like me around. The press can’t write about fruits in paisley shirts. They like somebody like Richard Harris or myself, somebody who’s a boozer and gets in fights and is colourful as hell.”

The British Film Institute wrote this, and a lot more, in their list of ten essential Oliver Reed films. The Devils features, as do two more collaborations with Ken Russell.
http://www.bfi.org.uk/news-opinion/news-bfi/lists/oliver-reed-10-essential-films

The Quietus, on the other hand, wrote a stellar defence of the actor when they celebrated the BFI’s release of The Devils on special edition DVD.
http://thequietus.com/articles/08283-oliver-reed-the-devils-ken-russell-bfi-dvd

Then there’s the modern-day reassessment of the critically panned film, and here’s some of the best:

Dave Evans has been good enough to give us the two amazing missing sequences from The Devils. Here we present to you The Rape of Christ, and the alternate ending.

 

Finally, you must watch Hell on Earth: The Desecration and Resurrection of The Devils, a documentary in which critic Mark Kermode goes on the search for the missing footage. Featuring interviews with many of the key players from the film.

 

If you want to follow us on Letterboxd as well, we’re always logging and rating films we’ve been watching and occasionally Luke will do some pretty in-depth reviews, too.
Luke Kane: http://www.letterboxd.com/overbreakfast/
Damien Heath: http://www.letterboxd.com/jedikaos/

Thanks again for checking out Celluloid Junkies. We’ll see you next month with a close-up, in depth look at the various film versions of “A Star Is Born”, focusing on Frank Pierson’s 1976 version starring Barbra Streisand and Kris Kristofferson.

Check out the work of this month’s special guest Dean Treadway, co-host of the “Movie Geeks United” podcast. Dean has been involved in film criticism, film festival programming, and television performance and programming for more than 25 years.

[To Be Continued]

Want an amazing array of information about Poltergeist? Then go to PoltergeistIII.com! Sounds funny, but it’s true. This is one of the best websites about the Poltergeist films, dealing not only with the original but its two sequels and the recent remake, too. You’ll find everything from marketing materials and press kits, shooting scripts, and even a floor plan of the Freeling house.
http://poltergeist.poltergeistiii.com

There’s a great deal of information available about the supposed ‘curse’ that was to befall the participants in the film, including this article from International Business Times.
http://www.ibtimes.com/poltergeist-curse-real-heres-true-story-behind-classic-1982-horror-movie-1932929

 

AMC’s Filmsite.org has done a great write-up on the film.
http://www.filmsite.org/polt.html

Check out some movie stills and their real-life locations from the movie, including the famous Tree in the Middle of the Road!
http://www.thennowmovielocations.com/2012/06/poltergeist.html

Finally, in the podcast we discussed the original versus its remake. Here’s some more opinions on that matter:

If you want to follow us on Letterboxd as well, we’re always logging and rating films we’ve been watching and occasionally Luke will do some pretty in-depth reviews, too.
Luke Kane: http://www.letterboxd.com/overbreakfast/
Damien Heath: http://www.letterboxd.com/jedikaos/

Thanks again for checking out Celluloid Junkies. We’ll see you next month with a look at Ken Russell’s much-maligned masturbatory masterpiece “The Devils”.

Our first special guest this month is Luke Buckmaster, author of “Miller and Max” first published in 2017. Luke is the film critic for Guardian Australia, and has also written for The Age, the Sydney Morning Herald, and Filmink magazine, as well as appearing on both the ABC and the BBC.

For Namibia and other under-developed countries, burning more fossil fuels offers one path to social cohesion and environmental preservation—the very opposite of collapse. The average Namibian creates just 1.4 metric tons of carbon a year, while the average Australian creates 16.7. In 2010, only 34 percent of Namibians had access to electricity, which means they cut wood or other biomass to cook dinner. Increasing electrification in Africa preserves remaining forests, cuts the time people spend scavenging wood, improves health, and, because of electric lights, creates more opportunities for education.

The environmental impact of the filming of Mad Max: Fury Road wasn’t lost on the country of Namibia. Ecological damage was caused and then left, but Slate did an excellent job of looking at how increasing use of fossil fuels (something the Mad Max series has forewarned against) could in fact help the country.
http://www.slate.com/articles/technology/future_tense/2013/02/mad_max_fury_road_filming_and_environmental_damage_in_namibia.html

Mad Max: Fury Road is now renowned for its amazing on-set stunts. A lot of what you see on screen looks exactly as it was shot, with little to no CGI used in many of the stunt or explosion sequences. Here’s a YouTube video showing what was shot, and how it looked in the final edit:

If you want to follow us on Letterboxd as well, we’re always logging and rating films we’ve been watching and occasionally Luke will do some pretty in-depth reviews, too.
Luke Kane: http://www.letterboxd.com/overbreakfast/
Cameron Crothers: http://www.letterboxd.com/crot00192/
Damien Heath: http://www.letterboxd.com/jedikaos/

Thanks again for checking out Celluloid Junkies. We’ll see you next month with a special Halloween episode on Tobe Hooper’s “Poltergeist”. Or is it Steven Spielberg’s? Hmmm…

Our special guest this month is Alexandra Heller-Nicholas, a prolific Australian film critic and writer of many articles and books on horror film theory. She is the author of “Devil’s Advocates: Suspiria” first published in 2015.

Alexandra is also the editor of and a writer for Senses of Cinema, one of the best film websites around. Check out her work, which includes a lot of writing on horror cinema and Australian cinema.
http://sensesofcinema.com/author/alexandra-heller-nicholas/

Alexandra wrote a piece of Suspiria, Argento and cinematographer Luciano Tovoli for Senses of Cinema.
http://sensesofcinema.com/2015/feature-articles/luciano-tovoli-suspiria/

You can also check out Alexandra’s personal website for a more comprehensive overview of her work, including other books that she has written.
http://www.thebluelenses.com

Suspiria is currently doing the rounds in cinemas, being projected in both 4K as well as from a new 35mm film print that has been discovered. Check it out while you can!
http://www.indiewire.com/2017/06/suspiria-uncut-35mm-print-discovered-screenings-1201844977/

Dario Argento is a student of cinema as much as he is a master. The British Film Institute took a look at five films that inspired Argento along the way to create his masterpiece.
http://www.bfi.org.uk/news-opinion/news-bfi/features/suspiria-dario-argento-influences

Den of Geek took a look back at Suspiria recently, calling it a one-off in their article “Looking back at Dario Argento’s Suspiria”.
http://www.denofgeek.com/movies/suspiria/21300/looking-back-at-dario-argento’s-suspiria

Film School Rejects also took a look back, focusing on the composition of shots used in the film to create an element of displacement and suspense.
https://filmschoolrejects.com/perfect-shots-dario-argentos-suspiria/

Slash Film have called Suspiria the craziest, most colourful bad dream you’ll ever watch.
http://www.slashfilm.com/suspiria-review/

If you want to follow us on Letterboxd as well, we’re always logging and rating films we’ve been watching and occasionally Luke will do some pretty in-depth reviews, too.
Luke Kane: http://www.letterboxd.com/overbreakfast/
Cameron Crothers: http://www.letterboxd.com/crot00192/
Damien Heath: http://www.letterboxd.com/jedikaos/

Thanks again for checking out Celluloid Junkies. We’ll see you next month with a close-up, in depth look at George Miller’s “Mad Max: Fury Road”, the second film we’ve looked at from an Australian director.

Our first special guest this month is Lesley Brill, author of “John Huston’s Filmmaking” first published in 1997. Lesley is a Professor of English and Film Studies at Wayne State University.

Our second special guest this month is Jason Taylor, who created and writes The Bogie Film Blog. It’s an invaluable source of information on Humphrey Bogart, so check it out.
https://bogiefilmblog.wordpress.com

Variety magazine from January 1949 listed the top box-office grossers of 1948. This is interesting just for historical purposes; the number one movie grossed $4.5 million that year, equivalent to about $45 million today. Key Largo came in 18th with $3.25 million.
https://archive.org/stream/variety173-1949-01#page/n45/mode/1up

Hollywood’s Golden Age looks at, well, Hollywood’s “golden age” from 1930-1959, and has lots of great trivia about Key Largo and many other films from the period.
http://www.hollywoodsgoldenage.com/movies/key_largo.html

One of our favourite podcasts is Karina Longworth’s You Must Remember This. We’ve referenced it numerous times, including in this episode and in our Baby Jane episode. Check out their episode on The Blacklist, HUAC, and Humphrey Bogart’s very bad trip to Washington in 1947.
http://www.slate.com/articles/podcasts/you_must_remember_this/2016/03/you_must_remember_this_on_the_blacklist_humphrey_bogart_and_the_african.html

Den of Geek call Key Largo the “definitive post-war film”, and we couldn’t really disagree as far as American films go. Just as Bicycle Thieves in Italy captured the post-war depression of that European country, so does Key Largo capture the triumph of patriotism and the defeat of Communism.
http://www.denofgeek.com/us/movies/key-largo/238347/key-largo-lauren-bacall-the-definitive-post-war-film

Movie Diva looks at Key Largo in the context of not only the film, but Hollywood at the time and the careers of all of the film’s major players, including Huston, Bogart and Bacall. Worth a read.
http://www.moviediva.com/MD_root/reviewpages/MDKeyLargo.htm

“4’33 The Movie” is a 2012 edit of Key Largo set to ‘music’ by John Cage. This experiment by Cage looks at creating music with the atmosphere, wherever and whatever that may be. Key Largo is a sophisticated mix of sound and action, and when the dialogue is removed, as it is here, it takes on a sinister quality:

 

If you want to follow us on Letterboxd as well, we’re always logging and rating films we’ve been watching and occasionally Luke will do some pretty in-depth reviews, too.
Luke Kane: http://www.letterboxd.com/overbreakfast/
Cameron Crothers: http://www.letterboxd.com/crot00192/
Damien Heath: http://www.letterboxd.com/jedikaos/

Thanks for listening to the first season of Celluloid Junkies. We’ll see you next season with a debut episode discussing Dario Argento’s Italian giallo horror masterpiece “Suspiria”.

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