Author: CelluloidJunkies

SPECIAL GUESTS: Author Murray Pomerance, “Alfred Hitchcock’s America”, and Author John Fawell, “Alfred Hitchcock’s Rear Window: The Well-Made Film”

This month we are profiling one of the greatest films ever made by a cinematic giant, Alfred Hitchcock’s 1954 thriller Rear Window.

This podcast is non-profit and has been broadcast for educational purposes. Excerpts from the following material has been included to enhance the listener experience:

Rear Window (1954) dir. Alfred Hitchcock, USA
“Bart of Darkness”, The Simpsons (1994) dir. Jim Reardon, USA
Alfred Hitchcock Talking About Fear (2010) YouTube video, iconic

“Rebecca – Suite” [Score] (1940) w: Franz Waxman
“Vertigo” [Score] (1958) w: Bernard Herrmann
“Psycho” [Score] (1960) w: Bernard Herrmann
“Obsession” [Score] (1976) w: Bernard Herrmann

Alfred Hitchcock’s “Rear Window” is an epic film, well and truly deserving of its place in the discussion of the best films of all-time. So we’ve done an epic podcast to cover it, and we’ve got an epic set of Show Notes to link you to some interesting discussion of the film. If you love the movie, we hope you’ll enjoy reading more about it.

Our first special guest this month is Murray Pomerance, author of “Alfred Hitchcock’s America” first published in 2013, and “An Eye For Hitchcock” first published in 2004. Murray is a Professor in the Department of Sociology at Ryerson University in Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Our second special guest this month is John Fawell, author of “Alfred Hitchcock’s Rear Window: The Well-Made Film” first published in 2001. John is a Professor of Humanities at the College of General Studies at Boston University.

John Fawell also provided the audio commentary for Universal Studio’s remastered release of the 2008 DVD of “Rear Window”. This audio commentary was carried over to the 2012 Blu-ray release, which is available separately or as part of the 14-movie Alfred Hitchcock Masterpiece Collection.

Filmmaker Jeff Desom created a time lapse of the amazing set used in “Rear Window” which is definitely worth checking out.
http://www.criticalcommons.org/Members/ccManager/clips/spatialized-timelapse-of-hitchcocks-rear-window/view

Or you could just check out 1,000 frames from the movie, courtesy of The Alfred Hitchcock Wiki.
https://the.hitchcock.zone/wiki/1000_Frames_of_Rear_Window_(1954)

AMC’s excellent Filmsite.org has one of the best write-ups on the movie available anywhere online. It’s a very in-depth analysis of the plot, as well as a brief history of the movie.
http://www.filmsite.org/rear.html

Likewise, Turner Classic Movies has a pretty thorough set of links dealing with the movie, including a synopsis, review, trivia, quotes and behind-the-scenes.
http://www.tcm.com/tcmdb/title/87777/Rear-Window/articles.html

Dramatica have done a comprehensive analysis of “Rear Window”, including a storyform analysis, character analysis and ploy analysis. If you’re interested in how Hitchcock’s film works in any of these ways, this makes for some very interesting reading.
http://dramatica.com/analysis/rear-window

No Film School have done a good analysis of the editing techniques used in the film. ‘How Hitchcock used editing to turn “Rear Window” into a masterpiece of visual storytelling’.
http://nofilmschool.com/2014/07/alfred-hitchcock-editing-rear-window-kuleshov-effect

Dangerous Minds have compiled a series of amazing behind-the-scenes photos, all of which are worthwhile for film historians, Hitchcock fans and lovers of the movie.
http://dangerousminds.net/comments/behind_scenes_alfred_hitchcock_rear_window

If you want to follow us on Letterboxd as well, we’re always logging and rating films we’ve been watching and occasionally Luke will do some pretty in-depth reviews, too.
Luke Kane: http://www.letterboxd.com/overbreakfast/
Cameron Crothers: http://www.letterboxd.com/crot00192/
Damien Heath: http://www.letterboxd.com/jedikaos/

Thanks again for checking out Celluloid Junkies. We’ll see you next month with a close-up, in depth look at John Huston’s “Key Largo”.

This month we’re embroiling ourselves in romantic entanglements whilst battling an existential crisis as we look back in appreciation of Woody Allen’s 1986 romantic drama-comedy Hannah and Her Sisters.

This podcast is non-profit and has been broadcast for educational purposes. Excerpts from the following material has been included to enhance the listener experience:

Annie Hall (1977) dir. Woody Allen, USA
Stardust Memories (1980) dir. Woody Allen, USA
Hannah and Her Sisters (1986) dir. Woody Allen, USA
Aliens (1986) dir. James Cameron, USA
Woody Allen: A Documentary (2012) dir. Robert B. Weide, USA

“Just You, Just Me” (1954) w: Raymond Klages & Jesse Greer, p: Nat King Cole
“Bewitched, Bothered and Bewildered” (1964) w: Richard Rodgers & Lorenz Hart, p: Barbra Streisand
“You Made Me Love You” (1941) w: Joseph McCarthy & James V. Monaco, p: Harry James
“Concerto for Two Violins and Orchestra” (1717-1723) w: Johann Sebastian Bach, p: The Sofia Soloists Chamber Orchestra

In 2010 The Guardian named Hannah and Her Sisters the seventh-best romantic comedy of all-time. Certainly many current rom-coms could take a hint or three from Allen’s masterpiece.
https://www.theguardian.com/film/2010/oct/16/hannah-sisters-romance

Want to go on your own Star Maps journey of New York City to see the locations in the film? Just check out this page, and then recreate David’s architecture tour with Holly and April as you meander through Central Park West, Lexington Avenue and Park Avenue.
http://www.movie-locations.com/movies/h/hannahand.html#.WL574KMr2CR

Woody Allen has obviously never been the best judge of his own work. He frequently cites Annie Hall, Manhattan and Hannah and Her Sisters as three “disappointments”. What are his favourite films? Stardust Memories, The Purple Rose of Cairo and Match Point. But why does he feel that his three most critically lauded films were failures? Find out here.
http://www.cinemablend.com/new/Woody-Allen-Explains-Why-Annie-Hall-Hannah-Her-Sisters-Were-Disappointments-31531.html

Carrie Fisher, who plays April in Hannah and Her Sisters, passed away in December 2016. She’s most famous for her role as Princess Leia in Star Wars, but certainly had many amazing roles throughout her career, in addition to her other work. Find out some of the best of her work here.
http://www.vulture.com/2016/12/carrie-fisher-non-star-wars-roles.html

Turner Classic Movies wrote an eye-opening retrospective on Hannah and Her Sisters which is well worth the time for any fans of the movie.
http://www.tcm.com/this-month/article/88182%7C0/Hannah-and-Her-Sisters.html

The Woody Allen fan-site Woody Allen Wednesdays does a “screening companion” for each of his films. Check out more tidbits of trivia and information on this and other Allen films.
http://woodyallenwednesday.com/hannah-and-her-sisters.html

Here’s the Reel Club article that we reference in the podcast. One of the best write-ups of the film available anywhere on the web.
https://reelclub.wordpress.com/2011/11/06/hannah-and-her-sisters-and-narrative-cinema/

Watch Woody Allen’s only appearance at the Academy Awards.

If you want to follow us on Letterboxd as well, we’re always logging and rating films we’ve been watching and occasionally Luke will do some pretty in-depth reviews, too.
Luke Kane: http://www.letterboxd.com/overbreakfast/
Cameron Crothers: http://www.letterboxd.com/crot00192/
Damien Heath: http://www.letterboxd.com/jedikaos/

Thanks again for checking out Celluloid Junkies. We’ll see you next month with a close-up, in depth look at Alfred Hitchcock’s prototypical voyeur murder-mystery masterpiece “Rear Window”.

SPECIAL GUESTS: Author Dr. Tarja Laine, “Bodies in Pain: Emotion and the Cinema of Darren Aronofsky”, and Author Dr. Jadranka Skorin-Kapov, “Darren Aronofsky’s Films and the Fragility of Hope”

This month we’re taking it to the mat as we pay tribute to Darren Aronofsky’s 2008 film The Wrestler.

This podcast is non-profit and has been broadcast for educational purposes. Excerpts from the following material has been included to enhance the listener experience:

The Wrestler (2008) dir. Darren Aronofsky, USA
Black Swan (2010) dir. Darren Aronofsky, USA

Score (2008) w & p: Clint Mansell
“The Wrestler” (2008) w & p: Bruce Springsteen
“Sweet Child o’ Mine” (1987) w & p: Guns N’ Roses
“Don’t Walk Away” (1990) w: Bill Snare and Bill Leverty, p: FireHouse

Our first special guest this month is Tarja Laine, author of “Bodies in Pain: Emotion and the Cinema of Darren Aronofsky”, first published in 2015. Tarja is the Assistant Professor of Film Studies at the University of Amsterdam.

Our second special guest this month is Jadranka Skorin-Kapov, author of “Darren Aronofsky’s Films and the Fragility of Hope”, first published in 2015. Jadranka is a Professor in the College of Business, Affiliate Professor in the Department of Philosophy and the Department of Applied Mathematics and Statistics at the State University of New York at Stony Brook.

We’ve touched in the episode on President Donald J. Trump’s association with professional wrestling, which began with his hosting WrestleMania IV in 1988, and was capped off with his induction into the WWE Hall of Fame in 2013. Here’s some interesting reading on the President’s time in wrestling, and his relationship with the McMahon family.

The history of professional wrestling is a rich and interesting one, with many melodrama-style stories of betrayal and reconnection. Perfect fodder for a filmmaker such as Darren Aronofsky. Here’s one of the best non-industry write-ups on what made the sport what it is today. ‘Breaking Kayfabe: An inside look at WWE’s unlikely business empire’ (VICE Sports)
https://sports.vice.com/en_us/article/breaking-kayfabe-an-inside-look-at-wwes-unlikely-business-empire

Aronofsky is a director of details, and The Wrestler has them in abundance. He even created a fully-functioning video game for one scene. ‘The Making of Wrestle Jam: The Wrestler’s unsung hero’ (Kotaku)
http://kotaku.com/5158834/the-making-of-wrestle-jam-the-wrestlers-unsung-hero

IFC (formerly the Independent Film Channel) ran an interview with Aronofsky around the time of the film’s release back in 1988. His favourite wrestler was Ivan Putski (not Putsky).
http://www.ifc.com/2008/10/darren-aronofsky-on-the-wrestl

The visuals of The Wrestler are grainy, realistic and entirely different from anything Aronofsky had done in the past. Part of that was due to cinematographer Maryse Alberti, who shot on 16mm to increase the grain and bring out the grit. She’s spoken about the movie several times, including to the Museum of the Moving Image.
http://www.movingimagesource.us/articles/making-the-wrestler-real-20090213

If you want to follow us on Letterboxd as well, we’re always logging and rating films we’ve been watching and occasionally Luke will do some pretty in-depth reviews, too.
Luke Kane: http://www.letterboxd.com/overbreakfast/
Cameron Crothers: http://www.letterboxd.com/crot00192/
Damien Heath: http://www.letterboxd.com/jedikaos/

Thanks again for checking out Celluloid Junkies. We’ll see you next month with a close-up, in depth look at Woody Allen’s “Hannah and Her Sisters”.

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