Author: CelluloidJunkies

Every October we celebrate Halloween by profiling a great horror film, and this year we’re taking Tobe Hooper’s Poltergeist out for a spin.

This podcast is non-profit and has been broadcast for educational purposes. Excerpts from the following material has been included to enhance the listener experience:

Poltergeist (1982) dir. Tobe Hooper, USA
Poltergeist II: The Other Side (1986) dir. Brian Gibson, USA

Interview: Tobe Hooper by Mick Garris
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k0dzAiebr-Y

“Poltergeist” [Score] (1982) w: Jerry Goldsmith

Want an amazing array of information about Poltergeist? Then go to PoltergeistIII.com! Sounds funny, but it’s true. This is one of the best websites about the Poltergeist films, dealing not only with the original but its two sequels and the recent remake, too. You’ll find everything from marketing materials and press kits, shooting scripts, and even a floor plan of the Freeling house.
http://poltergeist.poltergeistiii.com

There’s a great deal of information available about the supposed ‘curse’ that was to befall the participants in the film, including this article from International Business Times.
http://www.ibtimes.com/poltergeist-curse-real-heres-true-story-behind-classic-1982-horror-movie-1932929

 

AMC’s Filmsite.org has done a great write-up on the film.
http://www.filmsite.org/polt.html

Check out some movie stills and their real-life locations from the movie, including the famous Tree in the Middle of the Road!
http://www.thennowmovielocations.com/2012/06/poltergeist.html

Finally, in the podcast we discussed the original versus its remake. Here’s some more opinions on that matter:

If you want to follow us on Letterboxd as well, we’re always logging and rating films we’ve been watching and occasionally Luke will do some pretty in-depth reviews, too.
Luke Kane: http://www.letterboxd.com/overbreakfast/
Damien Heath: http://www.letterboxd.com/jedikaos/

Thanks again for checking out Celluloid Junkies. We’ll see you next month with a look at Ken Russell’s much-maligned masturbatory masterpiece “The Devils”.

SPECIAL GUEST: Author Luke Buckmaster, “Miller and Max”

What a day, what a lovely day this is as we take you on an auditory tour of George Miller’s vicious 2015 dystopian masterpiece Mad Max: Fury Road.

This podcast is non-profit and has been broadcast for educational purposes. Excerpts from the following material has been included to enhance the listener experience:

Mad Max: Fury Road (2015) dir. George Miller, Australia

Our first special guest this month is Luke Buckmaster, author of “Miller and Max” first published in 2017. Luke is the film critic for Guardian Australia, and has also written for The Age, the Sydney Morning Herald, and Filmink magazine, as well as appearing on both the ABC and the BBC.

For Namibia and other under-developed countries, burning more fossil fuels offers one path to social cohesion and environmental preservation—the very opposite of collapse. The average Namibian creates just 1.4 metric tons of carbon a year, while the average Australian creates 16.7. In 2010, only 34 percent of Namibians had access to electricity, which means they cut wood or other biomass to cook dinner. Increasing electrification in Africa preserves remaining forests, cuts the time people spend scavenging wood, improves health, and, because of electric lights, creates more opportunities for education.

The environmental impact of the filming of Mad Max: Fury Road wasn’t lost on the country of Namibia. Ecological damage was caused and then left, but Slate did an excellent job of looking at how increasing use of fossil fuels (something the Mad Max series has forewarned against) could in fact help the country.
http://www.slate.com/articles/technology/future_tense/2013/02/mad_max_fury_road_filming_and_environmental_damage_in_namibia.html

Mad Max: Fury Road is now renowned for its amazing on-set stunts. A lot of what you see on screen looks exactly as it was shot, with little to no CGI used in many of the stunt or explosion sequences. Here’s a YouTube video showing what was shot, and how it looked in the final edit:

If you want to follow us on Letterboxd as well, we’re always logging and rating films we’ve been watching and occasionally Luke will do some pretty in-depth reviews, too.
Luke Kane: http://www.letterboxd.com/overbreakfast/
Cameron Crothers: http://www.letterboxd.com/crot00192/
Damien Heath: http://www.letterboxd.com/jedikaos/

Thanks again for checking out Celluloid Junkies. We’ll see you next month with a special Halloween episode on Tobe Hooper’s “Poltergeist”. Or is it Steven Spielberg’s? Hmmm…

SPECIAL GUEST: Author Alexandra Heller-Nicholas, “Devil’s Advocates: Suspiria” and editor for Senses of Cinema.

This month we are celebrating the 40th anniversary of one of the most unusual horror films ever made, Dario Argento’s lurid supernatural shocker Suspiria.

This podcast is non-profit and has been broadcast for educational purposes. Excerpts from the following material has been included to enhance the listener experience:

Suspiria (1977) dir. Dario Argento, Italy
Opera (1987) dir. Dario Argento, Italy
“The Opposite”, Seinfeld (1994) dir. Tom Cherones, USA
The Stendhal Syndrome (1996) dir. Dario Argento, Italy
Dario Argento: An Eye For Horror (2000) dir. Leon Ferguson, USA

“Witchcraft” (1957) w: Cy Coleman & Carolyn Leigh, p: Frank Sinatra
“Main Title” [Score] (1977) w: Goblin

Our special guest this month is Alexandra Heller-Nicholas, a prolific Australian film critic and writer of many articles and books on horror film theory. She is the author of “Devil’s Advocates: Suspiria” first published in 2015.

Alexandra is also the editor of and a writer for Senses of Cinema, one of the best film websites around. Check out her work, which includes a lot of writing on horror cinema and Australian cinema.
http://sensesofcinema.com/author/alexandra-heller-nicholas/

Alexandra wrote a piece of Suspiria, Argento and cinematographer Luciano Tovoli for Senses of Cinema.
http://sensesofcinema.com/2015/feature-articles/luciano-tovoli-suspiria/

You can also check out Alexandra’s personal website for a more comprehensive overview of her work, including other books that she has written.
http://www.thebluelenses.com

Suspiria is currently doing the rounds in cinemas, being projected in both 4K as well as from a new 35mm film print that has been discovered. Check it out while you can!
http://www.indiewire.com/2017/06/suspiria-uncut-35mm-print-discovered-screenings-1201844977/

Dario Argento is a student of cinema as much as he is a master. The British Film Institute took a look at five films that inspired Argento along the way to create his masterpiece.
http://www.bfi.org.uk/news-opinion/news-bfi/features/suspiria-dario-argento-influences

Den of Geek took a look back at Suspiria recently, calling it a one-off in their article “Looking back at Dario Argento’s Suspiria”.
http://www.denofgeek.com/movies/suspiria/21300/looking-back-at-dario-argento’s-suspiria

Film School Rejects also took a look back, focusing on the composition of shots used in the film to create an element of displacement and suspense.
https://filmschoolrejects.com/perfect-shots-dario-argentos-suspiria/

Slash Film have called Suspiria the craziest, most colourful bad dream you’ll ever watch.
http://www.slashfilm.com/suspiria-review/

If you want to follow us on Letterboxd as well, we’re always logging and rating films we’ve been watching and occasionally Luke will do some pretty in-depth reviews, too.
Luke Kane: http://www.letterboxd.com/overbreakfast/
Cameron Crothers: http://www.letterboxd.com/crot00192/
Damien Heath: http://www.letterboxd.com/jedikaos/

Thanks again for checking out Celluloid Junkies. We’ll see you next month with a close-up, in depth look at George Miller’s “Mad Max: Fury Road”, the second film we’ve looked at from an Australian director.

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