Author: CelluloidJunkies

We’re doing something we haven’t done before as we take a look back at 2017. We’ll review each of the Best Picture nominees for next month’s Academy Awards, each list our five favourite films of 2017, and each give away 10 awards in the inaugural Celluloid Junkies Oscars Preview!

This podcast is non-profit and has been broadcast for educational purposes. Excerpts from the following material has been included to enhance the listener experience:

FILM
Silent Night, Deadly Night (1984) dir. Charles Sellier Jr., USA
The Silence of the Lambs (1991) dir. Jonathan Demme, USA

SONGS
“American Girl” (1977) w: Tom Petty, p: Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers

In the first episode of 2018, returning guest host Cassandra Kane joins us as we look at Frank Pierson’s 1976 romantic musical drama “A Star Is Born”.

This podcast is non-profit and has been broadcast for educational purposes. Excerpts from the following material has been included to enhance the listener experience:

FILM
A Star is Born (1976) dir. Frank Pierson, USA

SONGS
“The Man That Got Away” (1954) w: Harold Arlen & Ira Gershwin, p: Judy Garland
“Everything” (1976) w: Rupert Holmes & Paul Williams, p: Barbra Streisand
“Lost Inside of You” (1976) w: Barbra Streisand & Leon Russell, p: Barbra Streisand
“Evergreen” (1976) w: Barbra Streisand & Paul Williams, p: Barbra Streisand
“Evergreen” (1976) w: Barbra Streisand & Paul Williams, p: Henry Mancini Band
“The Woman in the Moon” (1976) w: Paul Williams & Kenny Ascher, p: Barbra Streisand
“I Believe in Love” (1976) w: Kenny Loggins and Alan & Marilyn Bergman, p: Barbra Streisand
“Finale: With One More Look at You/Watch Closely Now” (1976) w: Paul Williams & Kenny Ascher, p: Barbra Streisand

INTERVIEW
Streisand 1976 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZanBEbho7ro

 

Read the New West article “My Battles With Barbra and Jon” by director Frank Pierson. A riveting read full of interesting facts with very healthy amounts of rumours and innuendo. Who you believe may come down to where you sit on the Streisand Scale.
http://barbra-archives.com/bjs_library/70s/new_west_battles_barbra_jon.html

Check out Pauline Kael’s full, five-page review of the film. You may disagree, you may agree, but either way you’ll appreciate the way she puts her thoughts into words.
http://celluloidjunkies.com/podfiles/asib-kael.pdf

We’ve spoken a lot recently about gender inequality in Hollywood, and in this episode we specifically discuss changes in the acceptance of gender roles due to Barbra Streisand’s producing, writing and directing. She won an Academy Award for Best Original Song for “Evergreen” from this movie, the first time a female had won that award as a composer. Her role in changing gender stereotypes cannot be understated, but there is still immense work to be done.

Zohar Altman David wrote specifically about Streisand in his research paper for Tel Aviv University, “The star as a Creation and the Star as a creator: The case of Barbra Streisand”.
http://iipc.utu.fi/reconsidered/Ravid.pdf

 

[Click here to see full, high resolution version.]

In 1985 a cartoonist named Alison Bechdel wrote and illustrated a strip from her “Dykes to Watch Out For” series which included a ‘rule’ first posited by her friend Liz Wallace. It became known as the Bechdel Test, and started being used to judge the equality of acting roles for women. There’s three features of the rule, and to pass a film must meet all of them: first, the film must have two named female characters; second, those female characters must talk to each other; third, that conversation must not be about a man.

Does A Star Is Born pass The Bechdel Test? Unfortunately, that’s a big no. There’s only one named female character, and that’s Esther.
https://bechdeltest.com/view/3722/a_star_is_born/

Check out if your favourite films pass The Bechdel Test.
https://bechdeltest.com

Going back through our own archives, here’s how the films profiled so far by Celluloid Junkies performed on the test:

Film Pass/Fail (Score)
John Carpenter’s The Thing (1982) Fail (0/3)
Nicolas Roeg’s Don’t Look Now (1973) Pass
Peter Weir’s Fearless (1993) Pass
John Landis’ An American Werewolf In London (1981) Fail (2/3)
Martin Scorsese’s GoodFellas (1990) Pass
William Friedkin’s The French Connection (1971) Fail (1/3)
Darren Aronofsky’s The Wrestler (2008) Fail (1/3)
Woody Allen’s Hannah and Her Sisters (1986) Pass
Alfred Hitchcock’s Rear Window (1954) Pass
Robert Aldrich’s What Ever Happened to Baby Jane (1962) Pass
John Huston’s Key Largo (1948) Fail (1/3)
Dario Argento’s Suspiria (1977) Pass
George Miller’s Mad Max: Fury Road (2015) Pass
Tobe Hooper’s Poltergeist (1982) Pass
Darren Aronofsky’s mother! (2017) Pass
Ken Russell’s The Devils (1971) Pass

 

If you want to follow us on Letterboxd as well, we’re always logging and rating films we’ve been watching and occasionally Luke will do some pretty in-depth reviews, too.
Luke Kane: http://www.letterboxd.com/overbreakfast/
Damien Heath: http://www.letterboxd.com/jedikaos/

Thanks again for checking out Celluloid Junkies. We’ll see you next month with a close-up, in depth look at Lynne Ramsay’s adaptation of Lionel Shriver’s best-selling novel “We Need to Talk About Kevin”.

This month the revised Celluloid Junkies line-up is cloistered in an Ursuline convent, profiling Ken Russell’s disturbing 1971 political horror film The Devils.

This podcast is non-profit and has been broadcast for educational purposes. Excerpts from the following material has been included to enhance the listener experience:

Witchfinder General (1968) dir. Michael Reeves, ENG
The Devils (1971) dir. Ken Russell, ENG

“Devil’s Suite” (1971) w & p: Peter Maxwell Davies
“There is a Light That Never Goes Out” (1992) w: Johnny Marr & Morrissey, p: The Smiths

He could have been James Bond, but British cinema’s most notorious hellraiser lost focus and died at the age of 61, leaving Ridley Scott to piece together his final performance as the slave dealer Proximo in Gladiator (2000) using outtakes, body doubles and CGI. Such was the affection for Oliver Reed among BAFTA members, however, that he was posthumously nominated for the best supporting actor award. But the public had come to think of him as a drunk making a boorish spectacle of himself on chat shows and Channel Four forums like After Dark. “Let’s face it”, Reed told critic Roger Ebert around the time he made Women in Love (1969). “There has to be somebody like me around. The press can’t write about fruits in paisley shirts. They like somebody like Richard Harris or myself, somebody who’s a boozer and gets in fights and is colourful as hell.”

The British Film Institute wrote this, and a lot more, in their list of ten essential Oliver Reed films. The Devils features, as do two more collaborations with Ken Russell.
http://www.bfi.org.uk/news-opinion/news-bfi/lists/oliver-reed-10-essential-films

The Quietus, on the other hand, wrote a stellar defence of the actor when they celebrated the BFI’s release of The Devils on special edition DVD.
http://thequietus.com/articles/08283-oliver-reed-the-devils-ken-russell-bfi-dvd

Then there’s the modern-day reassessment of the critically panned film, and here’s some of the best:

Dave Evans has been good enough to give us the two amazing missing sequences from The Devils. Here we present to you The Rape of Christ, and the alternate ending.

 

Finally, you must watch Hell on Earth: The Desecration and Resurrection of The Devils, a documentary in which critic Mark Kermode goes on the search for the missing footage. Featuring interviews with many of the key players from the film.

 

If you want to follow us on Letterboxd as well, we’re always logging and rating films we’ve been watching and occasionally Luke will do some pretty in-depth reviews, too.
Luke Kane: http://www.letterboxd.com/overbreakfast/
Damien Heath: http://www.letterboxd.com/jedikaos/

Thanks again for checking out Celluloid Junkies. We’ll see you next month with a close-up, in depth look at the various film versions of “A Star Is Born”, focusing on Frank Pierson’s 1976 version starring Barbra Streisand and Kris Kristofferson.

SPECIAL GUEST: Dean Treadway, “Movie Geeks United” podcast co-host

Just for kicks, we present a special episode on Darren Aronofsky’s controversial and entirely brilliant new movie. It is simultaneously an unyielding exploration of faith; a harsh criticism of man’s plundering of finite natural resources; a relationship drama; and the most uncomfortable film an introvert could ever experience.

If you haven’t actually seen this film, stop now and see it. We’ll still be here when you get back, and we guarantee there will be a lot to talk about.

This podcast is non-profit and has been broadcast for educational purposes. Excerpts from the following material has been included to enhance the listener experience:

mother! (2017) dir. Darren Aronofsky, USA

“mother!” [Score] (2017) w: Johann Johannsson

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